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No argument here, but you can almost make those cookies at home since they and the NYT shared the recipe. 

 

Keep it coming...

That's only one of the 7 or 8 cookie types and she clearly gave them the softball, but yes, you can also slice a tomato and top it with some salt, herbs, and flowers at home but I prefer to pay my friend Bruno V like 27€ (I don't actually remember what the price) for that, have a stellar glass of wine and hang out with the superb team at Table.

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As I think Orik said, "it is that time again."   I will be in Paris for a few days in the beginning of December, any recommendations? New ones, old standbys? Places to avoid?   I have a bunch o

I suspect Bruni or Paglia wrote that review.

Had lunch here last week and it was so good I've booked dinner for next month!.   Added bonus of being right by the metro on the 8 line.

Interesting as I’ve seen this tendency developing with younger chefs here in Germany/Austria/n. Italy recently as well. Partly I suspect they just don’t want the personnel costs that it takes for Michelin cooking, but partly I think there is evidently client demand for pristine $$$ ingredients prepared in a straightforward way. I must admit I like remembering what I ate the next day. Which reminds me I need to write up some munich stuff at some point.

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We were in Paris when the Sur Mer (then Le Verre Vole Sur Mer) was threatening to break Not Drinking Poison's face. I've heard the current iteration is much better (and less violently alcoholic) but haven't tried it yet.

The former chef now owns the restaurant and she’s done nicely on her own with it. It’s really quite simple food, basically high quality shellfish relatively untouched. The atmosphere is high spirits but I cannot imagine threats or fistfights.

 

Like most of the best of Paris right now, the food is extremely simple and very high ingredient quality. It’s all the kind of thing you think you could pull off yourself at home, but you: 1) can’t actually get the best petit pois in all of France and 2) if you did you couldn’t cook them perfectly and barely at all, even though you think you could. Bruno Verjus recently served me an extremely sultry sliced tomato. While NY reintroduces sauces and the two most popular restaurants serve heavy French food, we’re just sitting around in Paris eating raw oysters, petit pois with lemon and butter, perfectly cooked poultry with a crispy skin and a sauce made from reduced tomatoes with raw tomatoes tossed in salt and olive oil. The French have not forgotten how to make sauces but they don’t do it just to prove they remember. The most popular lunch spot makes great cookies, better than any I’ve had in America (except for the occasional Abraco triumph). It’s like Alice Waters in 2019 if the ingredient quality were 30% better than at Chez Panisse and the technical cooking skills were 2-3x. Perfect for a summer of canicules and it goes well with l’heure bleue, because the magical sky in Paris definitely makes the food taste better.

 

Come at me.

 

 

Certainly, I've found that in my recent trips to Paris. The quality of the baseline inputs at places like Table and Sauturn, not to mention the precise, delicate, technique was far beyond what I ever get to see in North America. 

 

That said, I do get the general feeling (perhaps not empirically justified), that there is this sort of "Le Fooding" category of restaurant that is (i) yes, really popular with Parisians but (ii) gets a lot of focus from North American audiences, while there is also a deep category of restaurants cooking a more traditional style of French food, or a Michelin-style of of French food, that exists, and is seemingly doing really well, but doesn't get a lot of coverage in the English language press. 

 

I couldn't quite follow, but what sort of restaurant do you mean?  There are of course classical French restaurants all over Paris that are busy but not especially ambitious.  Is that what you mean?  I don't think French restaurant dining culture is the same as the US - being a foodie here is not really normalized the way it is in the US, imo.

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Interesting as I’ve seen this tendency developing with younger chefs here in Germany/Austria/n. Italy recently as well. Partly I suspect they just don’t want the personnel costs that it takes for Michelin cooking, but partly I think there is evidently client demand for pristine $$$ ingredients prepared in a straightforward way. I must admit I like remembering what I ate the next day. Which reminds me I need to write up some munich stuff at some point.

This is Michelin cooking, though.  And these cooks are clearly capable of putting out dishes - and in many instances do put out dishes - that you would see in Michelin 2 and 3 stars.  But a lot of the food is also quite simple and very ingredient driven and yes, it doesn't require 200 waitstaff and service teams wear multiple hats.

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.... there is also a deep category of restaurants cooking a more traditional style of French food, or a Michelin-style of of French food, that exists, and is seemingly doing really well, but doesn't get a lot of coverage in the English language press. 

 

 

Do you not think that for many that kind of dining has already been experienced and it no longer so revelatory?     It still holds a large audience, as it should.   

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Verjus makes a point to shop for much of the same product as Pacaud. 

 

Ethereal sauces are exercises in hidden butter.

 

Petits pois are lazy lagrimas.

 

I think French (and Spanish, for that matter) dining is far more seasonal - not just in putting seasonal veggies on the plate but in that the same place that will serve you a perfect lievre a la royale at such times when it is available, will go to seafood and peas in summer. Even the butter mine of Tribeca makes a mean sauce vierge. 

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I'll flesh it out a bit, to the extent I am qualified (which, to be clear, I am not):

 

There's a narrative that builds up in the English language food media about French cooking that is something along the lines of "there are these stylish little restaurants where chefs are cooking pristine ingredients in a precise but simple way and this is what French dining is now". Invariably, these are restaurants that get a lot of hype in Le Fooding and also are very culturally comfortable for the English language traveler armed with the latest issue of Monocle or Kinfolk. I really, really, really like these restaurants, but they tend to overwhelm the English food media's narrative about "Paris Dining Now" (though maybe not the nostalgia pieces).
 

But then you like open up a Michelin guide (https://www.theupcoming.co.uk/2019/01/21/all-the-paris-michelin-star-restaurants-2019-on-a-map-and-full-list/), or look at the press release every year, and you realize that there is a whole list of two and one star restaurants in Paris that get like zero media play. Have a google of a Comice, or Alan Geaam, or L'Arcane (literally just picking randomly here), or Lucas Carton, and there's a whole universe of restaurants that are cooking food that is much more traditionally French, or traditionally modern French, that are pretty much invisible to the English language food media (let alone a Jean Francois Piege or Sylvester, but weirdly not Le Clarence at the two star level). 

 

It's not surprising, but there is a Paris dining scene that is very under-the-radar in the English language world, even if it's a heavily starred dining scene.

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We've also been to the restaurants you mention and their ilk.   It occurs to me that maybe is also a generational thing.   Younger travelers, like me, tend to gravitate toward the, as you call them, Le Fooding rooms.    So good there is such a wide choice.

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We've also been to the restaurants you mention and their ilk.   It occurs to me that maybe is also a generational thing.   Younger travelers, like me, tend to gravitate toward the, as you call them, Le Fooding rooms.    So good there is such a wide choice.

 

Not sure about the relative ages here!

 

I think that there is a tendency for younger Parisians and Anglophone travelers (either younger or of a certain cultural ilk) to gravitate towards the Le Fooding/Brooklyn places. As I said, I really like these places, but the hot take (or maybe not so hot anymore) is that the Brooklyn style restaurant has supplanted the formal French restaurant as the signifier of worldliness, good taste and sophistication independent of relative quality within the marketplace. 

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Interesting as I’ve seen this tendency developing with younger chefs here in Germany/Austria/n. Italy recently as well. Partly I suspect they just don’t want the personnel costs that it takes for Michelin cooking, but partly I think there is evidently client demand for pristine $$$ ingredients prepared in a straightforward way. I must admit I like remembering what I ate the next day. Which reminds me I need to write up some munich stuff at some point.

This is Michelin cooking, though. And these cooks are clearly capable of putting out dishes - and in many instances do put out dishes - that you would see in Michelin 2 and 3 stars. But a lot of the food is also quite simple and very ingredient driven and yes, it doesn't require 200 waitstaff and service teams wear multiple hats.

Just so it’s clear I’m thinking about someone who had a star in the past but decided to strike off and do his own thing. No star currently but probably a candidate pretty soon — though if you talk to him he would (he says) prefer to be in the bibendum range as he doesn’t want the hassle.

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The idea of categorizing restaurants as to their "worldliness, good taste and sophistication" is quite foreign to me.   Tourists who would use such criteria probably have little of these characteristics.    And maybe that is what makes the Fooding group so appealing.   

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Could be that my region is rather conservative so having a star basically attracts a clientele with certain expectations of what value looks like, maybe different from a Paris audience. (And im not talking about tablecloths, most places still have those.)

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We've also been to the restaurants you mention and their ilk.   It occurs to me that maybe is also a generational thing.   Younger travelers, like me, tend to gravitate toward the, as you call them, Le Fooding rooms.    So good there is such a wide choice.

 

Not sure about the relative ages here!

 

I think that there is a tendency for younger Parisians and Anglophone travelers (either younger or of a certain cultural ilk) to gravitate towards the Le Fooding/Brooklyn places. As I said, I really like these places, but the hot take (or maybe not so hot anymore) is that the Brooklyn style restaurant has supplanted the formal French restaurant as the signifier of worldliness, good taste and sophistication independent of relative quality within the marketplace. 

 

 

Fava beans, three months before their season, sous vide spoon tender steak - Roberta's

Wild strawberries, three months before their season, sous vide rubber fish - PL @ Chef's Club

 

IQF is really going places. 

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We've also been to the restaurants you mention and their ilk.   It occurs to me that maybe is also a generational thing.   Younger travelers, like me, tend to gravitate toward the, as you call them, Le Fooding rooms.    So good there is such a wide choice.

 

Not sure about the relative ages here!

 

I think that there is a tendency for younger Parisians and Anglophone travelers (either younger or of a certain cultural ilk) to gravitate towards the Le Fooding/Brooklyn places. As I said, I really like these places, but the hot take (or maybe not so hot anymore) is that the Brooklyn style restaurant has supplanted the formal French restaurant as the signifier of worldliness, good taste and sophistication independent of relative quality within the marketplace. 

 

 

Fava beans, three months before their season, sous vide spoon tender steak - Roberta's

Wild strawberries, three months before their season, sous vide rubber fish - PL @ Chef's Club

 

IQF is really going places. 

 

The argument isn't that the Paris places aren't much better. 

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Verjus makes a point to shop for much of the same product as Pacaud. 

 

Ethereal sauces are exercises in hidden butter.

 

Petits pois are lazy lagrimas.

 

I think French (and Spanish, for that matter) dining is far more seasonal - not just in putting seasonal veggies on the plate but in that the same place that will serve you a perfect lievre a la royale at such times when it is available, will go to seafood and peas in summer. Even the butter mine of Tribeca makes a mean sauce vierge. 

Yes, I think Table is basically a much cheaper and easier reservation for the ingredients Pacaud is using without all the tweezer fuss.  Speaking of which, I should probably go see what Pacaud Jr did with restaurant Anne around the corner when he took it over or maybe any of his other restaurants.  Hexagone was quite good from what I recall. 

 

I don't know what it means to compare peas to tears, but maybe I'm just not translating right.  It sounds very poetic.

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