Jump to content

Paris Bistros, Restos


Recommended Posts

 

Les Enfants Rouges is a really delightful neighborhood restaurant that I'm not sure why I never see any talk about except maybe that it has been around too long and is too predictably solid but the exact sort of place that you only go to if you live nearby.  The food is Japanese French, delicious and delicate without being boring, and the desserts have a very nice light touch and are not especially sweet.  Its the sort of place I mean to go to more, although its also not open on Sundays or Mondays which I wish it were.

 

 

Funny you should mention that place...

 

 

We had a nice, but not earth-shattering dinner, at Le Galopin.

 

Has anyone else eaten at, and liked as much as we did, Les Enfants Rouges?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 1.3k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

As I think Orik said, "it is that time again."   I will be in Paris for a few days in the beginning of December, any recommendations? New ones, old standbys? Places to avoid?   I have a bunch o

I suspect Bruni or Paglia wrote that review.

Had lunch here last week and it was so good I've booked dinner for next month!.   Added bonus of being right by the metro on the 8 line.

As Le Galopin is again being mentioned, I would offer a warning that IMHO its spectacular days of "OMG how did they conceive of this combination" are over.    We haven't had an outstanding meal there since their attention was focused on Cave a MIchel next door.    In May we found that Romaine is again cooking at LG several days a week, the rest of the time at CaM.   But the time that we caught him at LG, the cooking was very tame and predictable compared to its early years.   

 

And i ask Jessika for her opinion of Cave a Michel.    I would go in a heartbeat if I could handle an entire meal standing at the bar.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Les Enfants Rouges is a really delightful neighborhood restaurant that I'm not sure why I never see any talk about except maybe that it has been around too long and is too predictably solid but the exact sort of place that you only go to if you live nearby.  The food is Japanese French, delicious and delicate without being boring, and the desserts have a very nice light touch and are not especially sweet.  Its the sort of place I mean to go to more, although its also not open on Sundays or Mondays which I wish it were.

 

 

Funny you should mention that place...

 

 

We had a nice, but not earth-shattering dinner, at Le Galopin.

 

Has anyone else eaten at, and liked as much as we did, Les Enfants Rouges?

 

 

Yes, well, you always live in the neighborhood.  I apologize to all who once posted about a thing.  It is probably not in the Bat and Bones thread and I did not go back and read everything we have ever written, as I couldn't bear it.  What if I ran into my 20-something self? 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

As Le Galopin is again being mentioned, I would offer a warning that IMHO its spectacular days of "OMG how did they conceive of this combination" are over.    We haven't had an outstanding meal there since their attention was focused on Cave a MIchel next door.    In May we found that Romaine is again cooking at LG several days a week, the rest of the time at CaM.   But the time that we caught him at LG, the cooking was very tame and predictable compared to its early years.   

 

And i ask Jessika for her opinion of Cave a Michel.    I would go in a heartbeat if I could handle an entire meal standing at the bar.

Oh I have a great time at Cave a Michel.  I have not had revelatory food, but I've had many unforgettable but forgotten evenings.  My somm friend likes it, which I suspect affects the treatment.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, well, you always live in the neighborhood.  I apologize to all who once posted about a thing.  It is probably not in the Bat and Bones thread and I did not go back and read everything we have ever written, as I couldn't bear it.  What if I ran into my 20-something self? 

 

Back then, we were probably staying in the 11th, right around Place Léon Blume. I loved that apartment (no longer available), on the 7th floor of a building, and with a great view of the Eiffel...

 

oS0pAiD.jpg

 

I thought Les Enfants was definitely worth the walk   :) .

Link to post
Share on other sites

I apologize if I've given the impression that we shun Michelin one stars. We visit them whenever one catches our eye.

 

If we're going back a couple of years, we went to Porte 12 immediately after it opened. Excellent welcome and table; delightful waiter, personable and fine attention. As I remember, they were given a star even before opening because of the interior design. The food was disappointing. One of the main plates we barely touched it was so salty. The entire kitchen staff stood behind their glass wall and stared between our plates and us. Rather amusing than intimidating. When we left, the entire staff stood at the door for goodbyes and inviting us back. Noteworthy is that a friend went for lunch and loved it so much he went back the same day for dinner.

 

We adored little Quinsou in the 6th. Again, delightful welcome and service. Food, including fabulous house bread, was superbly sourced and elegantly handled. Imaginative and bright. A thoroughly perfect evening. We returned after they received a star to find that the cooking had changed direction to a much simpler approach. It was good but very plain. For us, it lost the free spirited magic. Service was perfect but more distracted and not as personal as it had been. Friends continue to go there and enjoy it.

 

We tried La Condessa immediately after it opened and were delighted with its joyous ambiance, with Carrillo bouncing in and out of the kitchen, beaming like a delighted child. The plates were very good, the best being one in which he channeled his grandmother with a superb chili and amazingly delicious beans. Service was happy and attentive. We returned in a month or so to find the discovered restaurant more self-conscious, the plates leaning more to ordinary modern French, and again the best taste of the evening one inspired by his native Mexico. Give it another chance..so we did, and again found a majority of plates failing to hold our interest.

 

Baieta caught our eye last fall. While the website logo shows beaming country girls, the actual staff was coldly zen, zombie-like, self-consciously identical without expression, hair in tight buns. Perfunctory welcome and service. Nothing of the food was memorable except for the signature bouillabaisse which I found lacking in flavor and garnish. Skimpy might be apt. I seem to recall that the bread was good.

 

So we continue to try and to hope for a table that feeds both body and soul.

 

Am interested in others' opinions of these places.

Interestingly all those places were on initial research lists for previous trips but got dropped, mostly early on in the process (except porte 12 which is some sort of absentee chef "concept" so wasn't even considered), so it's hard to say whether you just don't like starred restaurants or you were hitting the wrong ones, but I would say that in Paris the one star category is a difficult one because it's a grabbag of underperforming two stars, old establishments (e.g. le Duc) that have no aspirations to go further, genuine one stars (E.g. Comice) and random errors like in every city.

 

But if you conclude that you just don't like restaurants of a certain kind then you can save a lot of money and time, yet maybe still recognize that the many reasonably skilled individuals who do like them are not all chumps.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Orik, first I think I indicated that other people we know liked at least some of these restaurants.   We are a tough sell.   People seated around us are happily chomping away and singing the chefs' praises, and I'm blaming myself for a crappy choice of spots. 

 

For the past several years I've been batting about 25% in happy restaurant choices regardless of level from holes in the wall to stars.    One star seems to have the most minefields I think because a bad meal is more annoying when served with an overachieving attitude.

 

We go out for a joyous evening of stunning food, scrumptious wine, a sweet and memorable encounter with our servers and hosts.  People who have followed our positive recs have usually experienced a pretty fine evening.

 

I don't consider any other other diner a chump, not even us when we make the wrong choice.    You have to place a bet to win, and we have too many extraordinary evenings under our belts to let the clunkers sour our thinking.  

 

In the end, it's only dinner.   And tomorrow you're going to have to do it all over again.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing certain from these many recent posts about Paris dining...it's obvious that someone like Jess, who has the great fortune to be spending many months in Paris (even though she's working), will have the opportunity to sample so much more than chumps like me, who get to vacation in Paris once every 2 years or so, and then only for a week or two.

 

So yeah, you live there, you get to know people in the biz, they recommend good spots, and maybe, by the time I or any other chump shows up, the place is still extant, and maybe even still good.

 

You pays your money, you takes your chances, as the saying goes.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I think that's why I'm hoping that some additional people who live here will jump in.  There's also what I like, what Voyager likes, etc, not always exactly the same but generally in alignment and then there are the whole dynamics of the culture here and how that impacts things.  As an expat I'll never quite be looking at things like someone French would.  I also hope we can have more frequent updates on both new things that are opening and places that might not be on everyone's radar.  I don't know whether those of you who read French are reading sources in French in addition to English, but I'm finding that the content in both languages is not typically the same.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

...People who have followed our positive recs have usually experienced a pretty fine evening.   I don't consider any other other diner a chump, not even us when we make the wrong choice.  You have to place a bet to win, and we have too many extraordinary evenings under our belts to let the clunkers sour our thinking.  In the end, it's only dinner.   And tomorrow you're going to have to do it all over again.

Well said &, as 2 of the people who recently followed several of your recommendations and had very enjoyable meals, we thank you for sharing your finds.

 

Well, I think that's why I'm hoping that some additional people who live here will jump in.  There's also what I like, what Voyager likes, etc, not always exactly the same but generally in alignment and then there are the whole dynamics of the culture here and how that impacts things.  As an expat I'll never quite be looking at things like someone French would.  I also hope we can have more frequent updates on both new things that are opening and places that might not be on everyone's radar.  I don't know whether those of you who read French are reading sources in French in addition to English, but I'm finding that the content in both languages is not typically the same.  

Couldnt agree more.  I'm somewhat saddened that your restaurant comments have come too late for my use (this trip anyway), but your attempts to share your opinion, get more input onto this board and sharpen up the dialogue are more than welcome.  Hopefully, you can persuade folks you know to come aboard to provide their perspectives and recommendations.  As it now stands, I cobbled together what I could from board hopping and tapping into those who don't (or won't) post here, but it would've been really great to hear more voices right here on my "home board".

 

And that holds true for other trips I've taken.  Our recent venture to Seattle was made much better by reaching out to Lauren, Leslie and the rest of the "MF ex-pats" who live there and were more than happy to share opinions and time (and a group meal) with us.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had dinner at Mary Celeste last night, a place I hadn't been to for at least 5 or 6 years.  While I would not describe this as ambitious food at all, we had a perfectly cooked octopus and a very delicious lamb rib, which had really nicely marbled fat and great flavor.  Two nice bottles of wine - a Georges Descombes "Régnie"(so so lovely) and a Clos du tue Boeuf gamay.  Neither of these were from it, but there is a wine firesale page filled with all sorts of lovely things- they must be trying to create cellar space??  I was very pleased with the choice for a summer in August and there were plenty of bar seats for walk ins.  I don't think I'd put this on a vacation list but it was a good reminder of a place thats always around and still does a good job.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good meal at Fleur de Pavé with Mrs. Stone (not her name, but for the purpose of reference) on Friday, which is a couple months old bistronomie spot in the 2nd from Sylvain Sendra in partnership with his gardener/produce guy Asafumi Yamashita. Unsurprisingly, this is farm to table type cuisine with Japanese influences, plus some Thai and Lebanese ideas from the chef's recent travels. Mrs. Stone and I opted for the vegetable based tasting menu "Le Légume en mode majeur" which featured vegetable-driven dishes but was not vegetarian.  It was a perfect concept for both of us.  The dishes, from a cauliflower in many textures to a lovely vadovan with vegetables to an interesting milk cake dessert influenced by Lebanon with pistachio ice cream.  Nothing here was something you will be shocked by, but everything was delicious and nicely executed and the team was wonderful.  I love a vegetable-driven menu that isn't necessarily committing to having a vegetarian meal - it keeps it on the light side but doesn't mean you're hungry or bored. I'm sure I'll be back.


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...