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Mexican Cooking Project #8


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thank you. i don't know if safeway's meat department qualifies as a "butcher". so, given that i am not going to wrestle with a bone-in shoulder for 30 minutes, and the possibility that there will never be boneless shoulder on sale, are the spare ribs the only option? (i assume these are also boneless.) will buying pork loin and cubing that be a bad idea? and what part of the animal does the meat sold ready cubed for "stew" come from?

Our local safeways sell the cut as boneless country ribs (and it's usually on sale for about $.20 a pound more than the bone-in); sometimes they also do label it as shoulder.

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I invited friends to dinner for Friday night, without a clue of what I might cook. Last evening, I found myself in front of the meat case at my local groceria, trawling for ideas, when what to my wond

What an absolutely lovely table, a delicious feast. Your guests are so fortunate!   And thanks for the invitation. I'll be briefly in Vermont in late March, all other things being equal. Maybe we

Follow-up...   Dinner was quite tasty. I had way too much liquid. That's okay because it tasted great. I simply ladled off a bunch of the cooking liquid six hours later and in a cast-iron skillet,

thank you. i don't know if safeway's meat department qualifies as a "butcher". so, given that i am not going to wrestle with a bone-in shoulder for 30 minutes, and the possibility that there will never be boneless shoulder on sale, are the spare ribs the only option? (i assume these are also boneless.) will buying pork loin and cubing that be a bad idea? and what part of the animal does the meat sold ready cubed for "stew" come from?

Our local safeways sell the cut as boneless country ribs (and it's usually on sale for about $.20 a pound more than the bone-in); sometimes they also do label it as shoulder.

thank you fml! the safeway on 28th/iris is where we go. they seem to have a paltry pork selection--perhaps i need to go farther afield. i did notice that they had a series of very scary looking pre-marinated pork in plastic wrapping thingies.

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thank you. i don't know if safeway's meat department qualifies as a "butcher". so, given that i am not going to wrestle with a bone-in shoulder for 30 minutes, and the possibility that there will never be boneless shoulder on sale, are the spare ribs the only option? (i assume these are also boneless.) will buying pork loin and cubing that be a bad idea? and what part of the animal does the meat sold ready cubed for "stew" come from?

Our local safeways sell the cut as boneless country ribs (and it's usually on sale for about $.20 a pound more than the bone-in); sometimes they also do label it as shoulder.

thank you fml! the safeway on 28th/iris is where we go. they seem to have a paltry pork selection--perhaps i need to go farther afield. i did notice that they had a series of very scary looking pre-marinated pork in plastic wrapping thingies.

Whatever you do, don't buy the pork at King Soopers. All of their pork is now that nasty moist and tender, injected adulterated stuff.

 

Ask at the 28th/Iris store, they probably do have it. If not, try the less appealing 28th/Arapahoe store.

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I buy a big ol' fatty pork butt/shoulder roast, bone in. Usually, about a 4-pounder. That way, it's easy enough to cut off about 2 lb of meat without having to scrape off every last bit from the bone. It's no trouble.

 

And then I throw the bone and whatever meat is still hanging onto it into the freezer, and drag it out and make soup a few weeks later.

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I made carnitas this evening..didn't really follow a specific recipe - I read Jaymes' first post on this thread, read Kennedy and Bayless and a bunch of stuff on the web, and then just did it. Really excellent. Lots of caramelization, lots of little almost burnt bits, wonderful texture and deep flavor.

 

Made tacos, and have plenty left over to play with tomorrow.

 

Thanks.

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I had thought about adding some left over coffee to the carnitas, or one of the other things mentioned here to get good color and caramelization - but it turned out to be totally unnecessary.

 

I'm about to have some for breakfast, on a tostada with an egg on top.

 

I could see making carnitas often, and just varying the additions depending on what's on hand and what I feel like.

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