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Guest Suzanne F

When I first brought home cardoons, I found a recipe in New Food of Life by Najmieh Batmanglij, a book of "Ancient Persian and Modern Iranian Cooking" for Khoresh-e kangar: a stew of cardoons, onions, meat (I believe I used beef, although lamb, veal, and chicken are also listed as possiblities), flavored with turmeric, parsley, mint, verjuice, and saffron. It was delicious, and worth all the work of cleaning the cardoons as described in the Sardine blog.

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Clifford Wright on artichokes and cardoons

 

It will be the purpose of this article to support the argument that the artichoke does not grow wild, that it was developed from the cardoon by the Arabs or Berbers, and that it was unknown in the Greco-Roman world.1

 

unfortunately this Arab/Berber doesn't have any recipes for either.

Whoa. That man is SMART.

 

Thanks for that link, Farid.

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Clifford Wright on artichokes and cardoons

 

It will be the purpose of this article to support the argument that the artichoke does not grow wild, that it was developed from the cardoon by the Arabs or Berbers, and that it was unknown in the Greco-Roman world.1

 

unfortunately this Arab/Berber doesn't have any recipes for either.

Whoa. That man is SMART.

 

Thanks for that link, Farid.

He's my fwend. Totally cool man, down to earth, funny, easy going. Oddly the writers I know who actually know about food tend to be really nice, friendly and open to learning.

 

Tana, you can add cardoons to a number of my Algerian recipes. The lamb with olives, couscous with seven vegetables, white bean stew, harira, just to name a few.

 

Cardoons are REALLY good.

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T- the last time I was in Italy I bought some interesting local veg, including cardoons, and cooked them very simply and served them with lemon and olive oil.

 

In Tuscany there are a very common winter veg (you see them in peoples gardens ever-where in the country), they are often used to make a sort of thick eggy souffle or fritters.

 

 

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  • 1 year later...

i made cardoon gratin recently from Babbo cookbook - it was very nice but it was a PITA to clean them (stinging) and they boiled unevenly (i used the Schneider's suggestion to cardoons them after the boiling).

 

Now i am looking at the Wolfert's recipe for leeks simmered in olive oil and she suggests the technique works well with cardoons though i suspect they should be parboiled anyway?

 

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Oh, yes, that's a tasty one, that gratin. Even Paul, who has a pathological fear of cream, liked it.

 

Not sure about the parboiling -- I think I did the first time I cooked them, but not since. But I did learn to wear gloves when trimming them. Those mothers HURT! :angry:

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Suzanne, thanks for an invaluable tip on gloves!

And speaking of cardoon recipes i just stumbled on Pino Luongo's cardoon risotto with white truffle - but even w/o truffle it sounds pretty neat - cardoons are parboiled then half of them are pureed into a broth while the rest is sliced.

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Janet Mendel's excellent Cooking from the Heart of Spain (imho way more interesting that her previous spanish cookbook that is more traditional) has a recipe for a cheezy (manchego cheezy of course) artichoke gratin cooked in cazuela, and gives a pretty vague sketch for a cardoon variation - "they need to be peeled, then cooked slowly until very tender".

Well, i'm trying this asap.

 

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