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cricket, the thread


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missed a great test between india and sri lanka. the first in the 3 game series was washed out. in the second, muralitharan caused havoc on a spinning pitch, but not before sachin tendulkar broke gava

Yes, that's a great little program they have there.   I saw a lot of Bedi in the early '70s. He did well to keep his career average under 30. In the absence of any test class pace attack, Bedi use

I'd certainly agree about Pietersen seeming unconvincing, he's the kind of player you never feel is in, and relies entirely on his eye, but it can be fun to watch... Vaughan just seems to be too keen

And how do you verify computer modeling of where a ball would have gone, had the batsman not stuck his leg in front of it?

By trusting us modelers. We promise to never use our powers for evil. Bwa-ha-ha!

 

Thing I also learned from that article: Dickie Bird is still alive!

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Fascinating, despite my general lack of familiarity with cricket. I don't know if I can think of another sport with a replay system quite like that. The Economist's case is a pretty compelling one. Although one of the small joys of playing competitive sports is the subtle art of cheating; the ability to play within or just past the boundaries of the rules. I would imagine blocking would be one of those things and it's a shame to lose it.* Thanks for that.

 

*Although it doesn't seem quite gone. The trick seems to be to block just enough that the opposing captain** is reticent to use a challenge.

 

** Is there another sport that gives such discretion to the captain as cricket?

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On your last point, yes there is quite a contrast between cricket and the major American sports in terms of the captain's responsibilities. Although there has been some erosion over the last decade, with ever more active management of cricket team, it has traditionally been the captain's responsibility to take all decisions once the team is in the field.

 

It's as if the Yankees played baseball and Derek Jeter made all the decisions about pitching, field placing and so on, while on the field. No reason it couldn't work, actually.

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No: statistics, apparently, and its reliability has been questioned in the past.

 

Since the batsman should get the benefit of the doubt, its use seems to me to be a contradiction of The Laws, and therefore an abomination.

Statistics to the extent that there will be variation in the errors. But I'd be surprised if they didn't do something similar to what I suggested. (And it's a 4 year old article. I'm sure it's a lot better now.)

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On your last point, yes there is quite a contrast between cricket and the major American sports in terms of the captain's responsibilities. Although there has been some erosion over the last decade, with ever more active management of cricket team, it has traditionally been the captain's responsibility to take all decisions once the team is in the field.

 

It's as if the Yankees played baseball and Derek Jeter made all the decisions about pitching, field placing and so on, while on the field. No reason it couldn't work, actually.

 

Baseball, up until recently, had a grand tradition of the player-manager (Pete Rose was the last one in the 1980s). I'd love to see it come back. It would be nearly impossible in modern football, hockey too probably, and would be workable in the modern NBA. In rugby, the captain has heightened responsibility, although, as you say, there's nothing (from my limited knowledge) like the system in cricket anymore.

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Sachin Tendulkar became the first batsman to post 100 international centuries today. Now, 49 of those came in one day games, so they're not real cricket, but he comfortably leads the list of test centurions with - obviously - 51.

 

It's interesting to look at the frequency with which he scores centuries in tests: one every 6.1 innings, which is very good, but comparable with other heavy scorers. It puts another player's record into context: Don Bradman scored a test century every 2.8 innings. Of players who scored at least 15 test centuries, I can't see anyone else who comes close to that (Herbert Sutcliffe a highly respectable 4.9).

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