Jump to content
Wilfrid1

Currently Reading...

Recommended Posts

Life

 

Keef is surprisingly articulate and readable. I'm liking this one quite a bit. I was never a big Stones fan, but I sense an iPod upload soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Life

 

Keef is surprisingly articulate and readable. I'm liking this one quite a bit. I was never a big Stones fan, but I sense an iPod upload soon.

 

 

I have to say, Chad, with your knife skills you should definitely take a look at the Icelander saga in previous post. They have swords you wouldn't believe, with names like "Leg Biter." ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard Times by Charles Dickens

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two-thirds of the way through Howard Jacobson's The Finkler Question. The early chapters reminded me of all the reasons I disliked his last novel, but then suddenly something happened and it became wickedly funny.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nutty book list recently. Still working through the old Charles Williams supernatural thrillers I hadn't previously read - three to go I think (an Inkling, if you didn't know). Poet's Pub, a 1930 comedy by Eric Linklater - hugely popular in his day. Reads like an old Ealing comedy (and there was a movie version; Joyce Grenfell and so on). Salavin, a tetralogy by Georges Duhamel. Worthy writer, but a sort of third division Proust. The first two books were good, but then it wanders.

 

Supposed to be reading some Beckett, I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Sentimentalists by Johanna Skibsrud. She won a Giller Prize for the book. So far (maybe 40 looooooong pages in), I'm not enjoying it. I can't empathize with any of the characters, nor do I want to. Hope it gets better soon. It's a pretty short book, though, so it has to be really soon.

 

Why did this book win the Giller Prize? Someone said (maybe on MFF) that Canada likes to reward mediocrity. Is this book an example of that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Colum McCann's Let the great world spin. I'm in the minority, no doubt, and I know Blondie and bloviatrix liked it a lot. Despite the setting when Petit walked a wire connecting the Twin Towers and all the poignancy related to them being there no more, I found this novel terribly dull and long-winded in so many places. There were some very interesting characters, Corrigan, the mixed up monk who shares his apt (to an extent) with some prostitutes near the Bronx's Deegan Expressway, is by far the most interesting. But the 'novel' feels like a set of short stories brought together by some interlocking coincidental meetings on the day of Petit's (hyper cool) gymnastics. If it were not for Petit and 9/11, the book wouldn't amount to much, I don't think. What is the major premise? Let the world spin? = Life goes on? In what meaningful way does it go on and what of the relationships on that day and after? If one is looking for a reflective piece on the accidental meetings of individuals I'd say the movies Sliding Doors and Up in the Air say a little more, but not much. Maybe over to those who liked it. What was there to take way from it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Colum McCann's Let the great world spin. I'm in the minority, no doubt, and I know Blondie and bloviatrix liked it a lot. Despite the setting when Petit walked a wire connecting the Twin Towers and all the poignancy related to them being there no more, I found this novel terribly dull and long-winded in so many places. There were some very interesting characters, Corrigan, the mixed up monk who shares his apt (to an extent) with some prostitutes near the Bronx's Deegan Expressway, is by far the most interesting. But the 'novel' feels like a set of short stories brought together by some interlocking coincidental meetings on the day of Petit's (hyper cool) gymnastics. If it were not for Petit and 9/11, the book wouldn't amount to much, I don't think. What is the major premise? Let the world spin? = Life goes on? In what meaningful way does it go on and what of the relationships on that day and after? If one is looking for a reflective piece on the accidental meetings of individuals I'd say the movies Sliding Doors and Up in the Air say a little more, but not much. Maybe over to those who liked it. What was there to take way from it?

 

Yvonne, for me it started with the writing. I thought McCann's writing was wonderful. There was something about his imagery - it's been 7 months since I read the book but certain descriptions remain stuck in my head : describing Jasmine's feet - the light soles contrasted with the dark tops. Also in the first chapter at the very end where he describes all the ways to die reminded me of liturgy. There was also something about the way he describes Petit's walk that I found compelling

 

It's very difficult to write a novel like this were there isn't an single, unified narrative. Jennifer Egan's A Visit From the Goon Squad has a similar structure and I didn't like it nearly as much. As for what to take away from it, I think it's the idea that everything is built upon something else. Everything is interconnected, even the smallest moments.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...