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Ah...Dudley Moore, such a talent and so maligned during the early stages of a horrific condition, progressive supranuclear palsy. This fatal
brain disease mimics drunken slurring and staggering. It is a terrible disease, like ALS that can last 15 years of increasing incapacitation.

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Aristotle was a fun read.

 

Also read an Aldous Huxley essay, Words and Their Meanings in the form of a tiny little hardcover, because RIT had a sale and they had a nice limited-edition reprint. Nothing profound, but... a nicely printed book, at least.

 

Starting on My Years with General Motors now, for some reason.

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Ah...Dudley Moore, such a talent and so maligned during the early stages of a horrific condition, progressive supranuclear palsy. This fatal

brain disease mimics drunken slurring and staggering. It is a terrible disease, like ALS that can last 15 years of increasing incapacitation.

And Peter Cook maligned for his authentic drunkenness. Remarkable talents, both of them. It’s very sad that the BBC lost most of the TV series they did together, Not Only, But Also.

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Lorine Niedecker, collected writings. Closely involved with Zukofsky and Williams, she never left her home on an island outside Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin.  From the short, highly condensed early verses, through to longer late masterpieces like "Paean to Place," is quite a journey.  She creates music from plain language and very brief statements. Like some painters, she tackles the same subjects repeatedly, with slight variations and refinements.

 

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/52185/paean-to-place

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Finally got round to it, and as I anticipated, I couldn't put down Sally Rooney's Normal People. One of the best stories I've ever read about Love in the Meritocracy. I'll probably launch a dedicated thread next week. Or perhaps in the spring, near its US publication date.

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Well, I ended up taking a break of a few months before finishing Brothers Karamazov. Had a pleasant afternoon reading Calvin Trillin's About Alice immediately afterward, though. Meant to read it years ago but it seemed like bad luck.

 

Finally working through the Nicomachean Ethics now. Oddly I'm finding Aristotle (in the revised Oxford translation from the complete works) rather more readable than Plato (from the Hackett complete works translation).

 

I think students read the Hackett Plato owing to its accuracy [for philosophical purposes], but I recall it being dreadfully dull. I generally choose Jowett when I want to -read- Plato.

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I think students read the Hackett Plato owing to its accuracy [for philosophical purposes], but I recall it being dreadfully dull. I generally choose Jowett when I want to -read- Plato.

It wasn't that bad. I mean, if I really wanted to amuse myself, I'd read Bloom's translation of The Republic.

 

My tastes in philosophy are also really weird. I generally find analytic philosophy far more readable than almost anything else, which I understand puts me in an odd minority.

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cornell and chicago university presses have both published a series of plato translations that are better and more literal than the hackett ones, if sometimes less fluid. the jowett translations are terrible and often include sentences that aren’t in the greek and make similar omissions.

 

I’d point to sach’s translations of aristotile.

 

lots and lots of heidegger can be cited in support of rich’s position.

 

eta: bloom’s would be the straussian recommended republic.

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Reading the Idiot again... Something about the Russians.  They are irresistible. 

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I am reading more analytic philosophy now than I did ten or twenty years ago. Much of it will appeal to minds with a mathematical bent. It’s possible to read Quine for pleasure; a distinctively American literary voice. I couldn’t now read Plato as literature.

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Filling in the gaps on Georges Bernanos. His early novel The Impostor is situated somewhere between Dostoevsky and Hubert Selby. A harrowing, visceral sense of evil.

 

The late Monsieur Ouine has been cited as a precursor of the nouveau roman. More specifically, I’d think it was written by Pinget if I picked it up blind. Bernanos well ahead of the game.

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