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Auster's Book of Illusions.  Why has it taken me so long to get to this?

very good read, but have you read Oracle Night? Even better. Auster is amazing.

Somehow I have reached this advanced age without reading any Auster. :lol: I'll read Oracle Night next.

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Just finished Ask the Dust by John Fante, a slim novel which didn't live up to the extravagant praise I've heard from Bukowski fans. Henry Miller and Hubert Selby did this kind of thing much better.

I'm currently reading Middlesex, has anyone else read it? I remember it being discussed elsewhere and people were criticizing the fact that it won the pulitzer prize. Maybe not Pulitzer Prize worthy

Several of the pieces in Paris to the Moon appeared earlier as Gopnik's monthly Letters from Paris to The New Yorker. His use of adjectives to describe the weather, the neighborhood, etc impressed me

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Auster's Book of Illusions.  Why has it taken me so long to get to this?

very good read, but have you read Oracle Night? Even better. Auster is amazing.

Somehow I have reached this advanced age without reading any Auster. :lol: I'll read Oracle Night next.

Actually, I envy you. I'd love to be able to have a crack at all of Auster's stuff for the first time again.

 

Everything is good but a few to pick up next are:

 

Leviathan

New York Trilogy (novellas)

Oracle Night

Mr. Vertigo

The Invention of Solitude

In the Country of Last Things

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I read Oracle Night in about 4 hours. Couldn't stop, and it left me wrung out. Yes, he's amazing. Anyone care to recommend another Auster for me?

 

I'm nearing the end of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Mark Haddon). The story isn't really that interesting, but the author's interpretation of the way an autistic thinks is fascinating. I've heard that a central dysfunction for (many? most? all?) autistics is the inability to filter information and stimuli, that everything around them demands their equal attention and they're in a constant state of bombardment. If that's accurate, then Haddon's presentation feels remarkably spot-on.

 

Edit: Thanks for the list, Ron.

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I'm nearing the end of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Mark Haddon). The story isn't really that interesting, but the author's interpretation of the way an autistic thinks is fascinating. I've heard that a central dysfunction for (many? most? all?) autistics is the inability to filter information and stimuli, that everything around them demands their equal attention and they're in a constant state of bombardment. If that's accurate, then Haddon's presentation feels remarkably spot-on.

 

i liked that book very much.

 

right now: Ali Smith's Hotel World.

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I'm nearing the end of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Mark Haddon). The story isn't really that interesting, but the author's interpretation of the way an autistic thinks is fascinating. I've heard that a central dysfunction for (many? most? all?) autistics is the inability to filter information and stimuli, that everything around them demands their equal attention and they're in a constant state of bombardment. If that's accurate, then Haddon's presentation feels remarkably spot-on.

I had a similar reaction. An excellent piece of ventriloquism but in the end rather so-whatish. It did cause major rat separation anxiety for a chapter or two, though.

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I love Paul Auster. The New York Trilogy is my favorite--Not often I read a work within a couple of years, but I did this.

 

The Invention of Solitude is a very good auto-bio and on first thought I wouldn't have recommended to someone who'd lost anyone, but....on thinking again, I think I would recommend it after a death of anyone important. Read it and see.

 

I liked Moon Palace too. Ditto In the Country of Last Things, but less so. For some reason I didn't get into Leviathan.

 

Never got into Auster's (or tanslations of others') poetry. Anyone?

 

His screenplays I like: Smoke and Blue in the Face .

 

Nothing to do with him being one big looker, of course.

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I'm nearing the end of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Mark Haddon). The story isn't really that interesting, but the author's interpretation of the way an autistic thinks is fascinating. I've heard that a central dysfunction for (many? most? all?) autistics is the inability to filter information and stimuli, that everything around them demands their equal attention and they're in a constant state of bombardment. If that's accurate, then Haddon's presentation feels remarkably spot-on.

I had a similar reaction. An excellent piece of ventriloquism but in the end rather so-whatish. It did cause major rat separation anxiety for a chapter or two, though.

I haven't read it yet because there is a waiting list at my school's library (I teach autistic kids). Everyone that reads it says his interpretation is as good as it gets out there.

 

To understand what it is like to be autistic (and this is just in the general sense)turn the lights on and off while listening to three different types of music, one of which includes a strong beat as people push you, hit you, poke you and scratch you while wearing steel wool. That's the kind of overload they deal with on a constant basis.

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I'm nearing the end of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Mark Haddon). The story isn't really that interesting, but the author's interpretation of the way an autistic thinks is fascinating. I've heard that a central dysfunction for (many? most? all?) autistics is the inability to filter information and stimuli, that everything around them demands their equal attention and they're in a constant state of bombardment. If that's accurate, then Haddon's presentation feels remarkably spot-on.

I had a similar reaction. An excellent piece of ventriloquism but in the end rather so-whatish. It did cause major rat separation anxiety for a chapter or two, though.

Me too. Not a particularly interesting story. I didn't find the description of autism to be better than most ABC after school specials.

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