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Just finished Ask the Dust by John Fante, a slim novel which didn't live up to the extravagant praise I've heard from Bukowski fans. Henry Miller and Hubert Selby did this kind of thing much better.

I'm currently reading Middlesex, has anyone else read it? I remember it being discussed elsewhere and people were criticizing the fact that it won the pulitzer prize. Maybe not Pulitzer Prize worthy

Several of the pieces in Paris to the Moon appeared earlier as Gopnik's monthly Letters from Paris to The New Yorker. His use of adjectives to describe the weather, the neighborhood, etc impressed me

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I just finished slogging through Absalom, Absalom! Quite an ordeal, but well worth it. It's my third read, and I think that each time I've actually "read" a larger pecentage of words, as opposed to running my eyes over them.

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Read Marjane Satrapi's 'Persepolis' yesterday. It's a graphic novel about the author's childhood in Iran during the '79 revolution, the subsequent fundamentalist government and the following war with Iraq.  It manages to be harrowing and funny at the same time, very good stuff.

I loved Persepolis. Satrapi is a wonderful storyteller. I need to read Persepolis II.

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I was thinking of The Metaphysical Club for a holiday read this year. Was it good?

I think it's very good, but I'm only about 1/3 of the way through. Some of it reads like a novel, not to say it's lightweight, just pleasurable reading.

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I just finished slogging through Absalom, Absalom! Quite an ordeal, but well worth it. It's my third read, and I think that each time I've actually "read" a larger pecentage of words, as opposed to running my eyes over them.

I tried to read that a while ago. I have read Faulkner before with success, but not that time. I'm going to start a new thread about that.

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I just finished slogging through Absalom, Absalom!  Quite an ordeal, but well worth it.  It's my third read, and I think that each time I've actually "read" a larger pecentage of words, as opposed to running my eyes over them.

I tried to read that a while ago. I have read Faulkner before with success, but not that time. I'm going to start a new thread about that.

What, books you tried like hell to read but just couldn't get through?

 

Then: Brief History of Time and Foucault's Pendulum.

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I just finished slogging through Absalom, Absalom!   Quite an ordeal, but well worth it.  It's my third read, and I think that each time I've actually "read" a larger pecentage of words, as opposed to running my eyes over them.

I tried to read that a while ago. I have read Faulkner before with success, but not that time. I'm going to start a new thread about that.

What, books you tried like hell to read but just couldn't get through?

 

Then: Brief History of Time and Foucault's Pendulum.

Yes. Done. With much less procrastinating than me cleaning my house today seems to be going, damn you all.

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Frank Stella's Working Space lectures, in which he sets abstraction, its failings and its yet unrealised potentialities, in the context of a discussion of pictorial space in Caravaggio and other old masters. Maybe I am easily impressed, but the argument so far strikes me as quite brilliant. And it gave me a new set of eyes with which to look at the Kandinsky paintings, which the Guggenheim have crammed together in a pokey little permanent space off the second floor.

 

I think it's out-of-print, but I highly recommend it to anyone who appreciates having art explained in pictorial terms. A breath of fresh air after several lectures I have sat through at MOMA recently, in which art historians draw on their limited knowledge of psychology and bold ignorance of philosophy to explain (even abstract) art in terms of everything except what is in the pictures. :blink:

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Frank Stella's Working Space lectures, in which he sets abstraction, its failings and its yet unrealised potentialities, in the context of a discussion of pictorial space in Caravaggio and other old masters. Maybe I am easily impressed, but the argument so far strikes me as quite brilliant. And it gave me a new set of eyes with which to look at the Kandinsky paintings, which the Guggenheim have crammed together in a pokey little permanent space off the second floor.

 

I think it's out-of-print, but I highly recommend it to anyone who appreciates having art explained in pictorial terms. A breath of fresh air after several lectures I have sat through at MOMA recently, in which art historians draw on their limited knowledge of psychology and bold ignorance of philosophy to explain (even abstract) art in terms of everything except what is in the pictures. :blink:

Though it's been a while since I've opened the cover AND personally I'm not a big fan of Stella the person or of his later work, I loved that book.

 

As a matter of fact, one of my first studios was in an office building that required a title on the door and I elected to call it "Working Space" in honor of that lecture series.

 

Unfortunately he has not employed abstraction's "unrealised potentialities" in his recent work, IMO.

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But if you want huge great twisted bits of metal painted bright colors, he's your man. :blink:

 

*Edited by flyfish to remove Wilf's original edit now that this post has been moved into Currently Reading

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