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Why not?

 

Robert can speak for himself, but if he is saying that a New York City restaurant which confined itself to locally sourced fresh fish (taking local to extend into the Northeastern Atlantic) would be at a disadvantage compared to a restaurant to which the Mediterranean or Adriatic are local, I should have thought he was right. (And thus that New York City's an unlikely candidate for having the best fish restaurant in the world: even right-er.)

 

(Le Bernardin, Esca, etc, don't restrict themselves of course.)

 

I've never been to Japan, so I'll leave that comparison to others.

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Very good $48 prix fixe lunch at Le Bernardin. We had ordered the 24 hour advance notice red snapper (for two people). It is cooked in a salt and breadcrumb crust; presented dramatically, tableside,

If I remember corectly: milk chocolate crème brûlée on the bottom, maple caramel on top finished with caramel foam and maldon salt

I guess I'd lend mine to Champale. After all it is the champagne of ales*.       *Ales in this case referring to malt liquor of course.

How can a restaurant specializing in fish that is in a place that is fish-deprived relative to countries surrounded by seas and offers a junk fish (escolar) banned in Italy and Japan be voted the best fish restaurant there is? Better than serious restaurants getting fish off the Tuscan coast, the Adriatic/Venice lagoon and the inland seas of Japan? These lists are a joke and are meaningless to anyone the least bit gourmand.

I don't understand your hatred. Although I do agree that lists like that are useless.

 

They don't offer escolar now.

 

And afaik, they never did, and do not now, claim to serve only fish available from local waters. Long-term relationship with Rod Mitchell of Browne Trading, among other sources. I still remember (20 years ago) chefs going out to get overnighted turbot from the FedEx delivery guy when he could not get into the building.

 

I suggest you not read my write-up of today's lunch (TK), lest you think me in LeB's pocket.

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I am absolutely not disagreeing with the assertion that fish are better in the Mediterranean than here. You'd have to be crazy to disagree with that.

Well isn't that all he's saying: that it's a dubious ranking? I mean Le B is fine and all that, but I'd go to Rias de Galicia every time.

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Sure. But you can make that point without twisting geography. It's kind of silly to make a coastal city sound like Topeka or something.

 

I grew up on the water and we fished all the time.

 

The problem isn't that New York is landlocked. It's no more landlocked than Venice. The problem is that it isn't by a really great fishery.

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Why not?

 

Robert can speak for himself, but if he is saying that a New York City restaurant which confined itself to locally sourced fresh fish (taking local to extend into the Northeastern Atlantic) would be at a disadvantage compared to a restaurant to which the Mediterranean or Adriatic are local, I should have thought he was right. (And thus that New York City's an unlikely candidate for having the best fish restaurant in the world: even right-er.)

 

(Le Bernardin, Esca, etc, don't restrict themselves of course.)

 

I've never been to Japan, so I'll leave that comparison to others.

A large proportion of the luxe fishes and shellfish you get in Europe are caught in the Atlantic. There is after all a reason why all the fish places in Madrid are named after places in Galicia. A place which last I checked was not on there med.

 

 

The Adriatic is basically fished out. Not to mention NY harbor is cleaner than the Venetian Lagoon.

 

There problem in this area is driven by overfishing and terrible supply chain.

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Sure. But you can make that point without twisting geography. It's kind of silly to make a coastal city sound like Topeka or something.

 

I grew up on the water and we fished all the time.

 

The problem isn't that New York is landlocked. It's no more landlocked than Venice. The problem is that it isn't by a really great fishery.

The great south bay was once a massively productive fishery.

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