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The mistake was buying these books BEFORE I went on a 7 mile hike around town. This was about 1300 pesos, just over $100. The average price of the books was about 40 pesos, or under $4. That's 37 books purchased in total. Not sure where I'll fit them for the trip back.

 

1. nahua del norte de Veracruz

3. maya de Quintana roo

4. nahua de morelos

6. indigenas de la sierra norte de puebla

7. comida de los tarahumaras

9. (x2) indigena de Sonora

11. indigena del sur de Veracruz

13. veracruzano de cuaresma y navidad

18. tuxteco

19. nahua de milpa alta, df

20. chinateco de Oaxaca

23. bebidas y dulces tradicionales de Tabasco

24. popular de chilpancingo y tixtla

26. pame de san luis potosi y queretaro

27. menonita de Chihuahua

29. (x2) aromas y sabores de Nuevo leon

30. chocholteco de Oaxaca

31. nahua de zongolica, veracruz

32. exotico de Sinaloa

34. indigena de baja California

37. las atapakuas purepechas

40. viejos sabores de Tamaulipas

41. popular coleto

42. mazateco de Oaxaca

43. tradicional morelense

44. totonaco de la costa de Veracruz

45. exotica de Chiapas

46. huichol de Nayarit

47. zoque de Chiapas

51. recetario mascogo de Coahuila

52. sierra gorda de queretaro

53. (x2) tepehuano de Chihuahua y Durango

54. huasteca hidalguense

55. pescado, aves, y otros animals de la region lacustre de patzcuaro, michoacan

 

Checked out Zurita's book of classics and it seemed too basic. All the chile relleno books of his were plastic wrapped so I skipped it for now. Saw Kennedy's book in soft-cover at Sanborn's. If it's at Sanborn's I'm sure it's everywhere else. I wish I knew whether the English version will be different or not. I'd much rather have the English version if they'll be fundamentally the same. I can read Spanish okay, but not to get the nuances of exacting recipes. Not sure what's on my schedule for tomorrow. My to-do list was on my brand new $200 HTC Droid Incredible that was lost/stolen today. I have a feeling it was lifted from my pocket during an especially crowded metro bus ride. Save $4 by not taking a taxi, lose $200 and a lot of notes, emails, etc, plus my ability to get a map of where I am.

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My to-do list was on my brand new $200 HTC Droid Incredible that was lost/stolen today. I have a feeling it was lifted from my pocket during an especially crowded metro bus ride. Save $4 by not taking a taxi, lose $200 and a lot of notes, emails, etc, plus my ability to get a map of where I am.

Ouch

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anybody checked the latest Bayless' book?

 

2 posts above yours!

 

sorry i missed it - got the book yesterday and agree with your assessment. great ideas for planning the party menu. At first glance recipes don't seem to be too involved.

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Checked out Zurita's book of classics and it seemed too basic. All the chile relleno books of his were plastic wrapped so I skipped it for now. Saw Kennedy's book in soft-cover at Sanborn's. If it's at Sanborn's I'm sure it's everywhere else. I wish I knew whether the English version will be different or not. I'd much rather have the English version if they'll be fundamentally the same. I can read Spanish okay, but not to get the nuances of exacting recipes. Not sure what's on my schedule for tomorrow.

 

I saw the galleys for the Kennedy book and it's very similar and a little more attractive. I don't think you need the Spanish unless you are totally insane, as I clearly am. But it was the Oaxaca book in softcover? Are you sure it wasn't Cuisines of MX? The Larousse Zurita isn't essential but the chile rellenos is, I believe. The chile cover is awful and piss-elegant but inside it's near perfect and bilingual.

 

Sorry about your phone. that's a real drag.

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Yeah, probably another book of hers. I didn't look too carefully since I didn't want a softcover version. I think I had remembered wrong that it was out in paperback. Saw it today at Gandhi for about 1300 pesos. Didn't pull the trigger. I mean, $30 for the English version or $100 for the Spanish version. If the former is the same as the latter except the idioma, then I'll go with my native tongue at a third the price.

 

Picked up some more books. Visited two different Gandhis. Decided against the Salsas book and several others in that series. There's just not enough unique about them for me to put my money there rather than elsewhere. I did pick up the Antojitos book in that series, though (the Larousse 100% Mexico series). All the items are basic, but instead of showing carnitas for the average home cook or al pastor for the average home cook -- even Mexican home cooks -- they show how it's done in taquerias with pastor on the trompo and carnitas in a big cazo de cobre. Stuff like that. Worth the $10 because of it. I also decided after looking through it to get the Chile Rellenos book. I think there are enough gems there it'll be a good one on the shelf.

 

Otherwise, I picked up tow books that are less typical: Jairo Mejia's Cocina Mexicana del Siglo XIX and Fernando Diez de Urdanivia's

Dichas y Dichos de La Gastronomia Insolita Mexicana. That latter one will probably push the limits of my (bad) Spanish, but I couldn't pass it up.

 

I also grabbed a couple used books from the librerias near the Cathedral. I think I got gringo'd hardcore, but that's okay. Went in and asked about libros de comida mexicana. The first place grabbed four items of the shelf and two were junk, while two I ended up buying. No prices on anything. I should have offered, probably, but instead asked for the price. Something like 250 pesos. That's more than they would be new. I refused and we got down to 150 pesos for the two, which was fair, I think. The books were Patricia Gonzalez's Los Mejores Antojitos Mexicanos and Banrural's Comida Familiar en la Ciudad de Mexico. Both are in pretty good shape. The former is divided by region and there are plenty of interesting items that seem unusual to me. The second is so focused it's right up my alley. Certainly unlikely I'd find these elsewhere.

 

That's it. I do pick up some of the little cooking magazines now and then that you see everywhere when they focus on something. I plan to check out some museum bookstores, but other than that, I'm about done, I think. Not much more room in my suitcase.

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<snip>

I saw the galleys for the Kennedy book and it's very similar and a little more attractive. I don't think you need the Spanish unless you are totally insane, as I clearly am. But it was the Oaxaca book in softcover? Are you sure it wasn't Cuisines of MX? The Larousse Zurita isn't essential but the chile rellenos is, I believe. The chile cover is awful and piss-elegant but inside it's near perfect and bilingual.

 

<snip>

That's great news. I saw the original a couple of years ago (Ruth Alegria was showing it around at IACP and complaining about its lack of distribution).

 

BTW: I have an extra copy of Kennedy's The Art of Mexican Cooking, mistakenly bought when the newer one came out. If anyone would like one, PM me.

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Another score. So after going to Tacos Gus and Tacos Hola in La Condesa, I was walking up Nuevo Leon and found this cool bookstore/cafe/music store, El Pendulo. Reminds me of Portland. And free wi-fi and World Cup. Didn't see anything on the shelves, but as I was walking out the door, I noticed a pile on the sale section with a series of books I instantly bought:

 

Cocina Familiar for....

* Chiapas

* Baja California

* Baja California Sur

* Nuevo Leon

* Colima

* Coahuila

* Jalisco

* Tabasco

* Chihuahua

* San Luis Potosi

* Tamaulipas

* Nayarit

 

25 pesos each. I think I have a couple already, but at less than $2.50 each, I'll risk it. The only question now is how I get all these on the plane. They'll fit in my bag, but I'm pretty sure it's over 50lbs now. Oh, and a tasty agua fresca del dia, pineapple with mint, I think.

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...Fernando Diez de Urdanivia's Dichas y Dichos de La Gastronomia Insolita Mexicana....

This is a great book; you'll love it. The introduction is by my old friend Giorgio d'Angeli, may he rest in peace--his widow is Alicia Gironella, the grande dame of alta cocina mexicana.

 

If you get stuck anyplace in the Spanish, feel free to ask...

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Picked up some more in the Indigena y Popular series. I'll give an updated list of all the ones I own later. Also picked up some other books, though, mostly in Puebla from a book shop at 7 poniente and 3 sur (and Antojitos Tommy one block away makes some great items) that theobroma recommended. I may have gotten a couple of these elsewhere, such as the Gandhi in Coyoacan:

 

From the Coleccion Recetarios Antigues series:

* Recetario Novohispano, Anonimo, Mexico, Siglo XVIII

* Recetario de Tepetitlan, Lucia Cabrera de Azcarate, Puebla, 1901

* Recetario de Mascota, Jalisco, Hildelisa Martinez de Quintero, Fines del XIX

 

Los Quesos Mexicanos Genuinos - Patrimonio cultural que debe rescatarse

-- Looks like a great reference with a histories of cheeses in Mexico and detailed descriptions of cheeses based very regionally. One of my favorite tables in the books has a few dozen cheeses with columns giving their names, their origins, the formula!!! for the cheese, and then the basic characteristics of the cheese.

 

And then one that I'm tempted to keep for myself, but am planning to send to a friend:

* Los Libros de la Cocina Mexicana, Cristina Barros

 

 

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Okay, here are all the ones I have:

 

01. nahua del norte de Veracruz

03. maya de Quintana roo

04. nahua de morelos

05. guanajuatense del xoconostle

06. indigenas de la sierra norte de puebla

07. comida de los tarahumaras

09. indigena de Sonora

10. del maiz

11. indigena del sur de Veracruz

13. veracruzano de cuaresma y navidad

14. popular de campeche

15. de tamales

18. tuxteco

19. nahua de milpa alta, df

20. chinateco de Oaxaca

22. las flores en la cocina mexicana

23. bebidas y dulces tradicionales de Tabasco

24. popular de chilpancingo y tixtla

25. colimense de la iguana

26. pame de san luis potosi y queretaro

27. menonita de Chihuahua

28. de pescados y mariscos de sonora

29. aromas y sabores de Nuevo leon

30. chocholteco de Oaxaca

31. nahua de zongolica, veracruz

32. exotico de Sinaloa

34. indigena de baja California

36. indigena de guerrero

37. las atapakuas purepechas

40. viejos sabores de Tamaulipas

41. popular coleto

42. mazateco de Oaxaca

43. tradicional morelense

44. totonaco de la costa de Veracruz

45. exotica de Chiapas

46. huichol de Nayarit

47. zoque de Chiapas

48. del nopal del milpa alta, df y colima

49. de la cuachala y la birria

51. recetario mascogo de Coahuila

52. sierra gorda de queretaro

53. tepehuano de Chihuahua y Durango

54. huasteca hidalguense

55. pescado, aves, y otros animals de la region lacustre de patzcuaro, michoacan

 

And here are the ones I'm missing:

 

12. veracruzano de cuaresma y navidad

16. de la costa de oaxaca

17. del estado de yucatan

21. la dulceria en puebla

33. zapoteco del istmo

35. de hongos de veracruz

38. mixe de oaxaca

39. indigena de chiapas

50. el sabor de las plantas de veracruz

 

I can't remember if they ended up producing more than the 55.

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If you have an interest in regional Mexican food, Diana Kennedy's Mexico al gusto is now in English and it's terrific. Not as practical as you may want, but there's plenty to cook and plenty to plan on trying once you get deep into Oaxaca.

 

Any sources for iguana meat?

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Scott at DallasFood.org had been joking that someday the iguana volume was going to be worth a lot of money. So on this last trip to DF I bought every volume I could find. On my return layover at DFW, I handed him a package with 20 copies. It has to be nearly every copy in Mexico City.

 

Picked up A LOT of books on this last trip. Now have all but volumes 17 & 21 of the Indigena y Popular series, 54 of the 56 volumes. Still missing a good number of the Familiar series, though I picked up a copy of Sonora, which I really wanted. The northern states don't get much play in most Mexican cookbooks.

 

They were doing this great series for the bicentennial where they had a magazine of recipes organized by state. Most of the states weren't available in DF, but a lot of the big name states were and I picked up several. Lots of magazines overall. I always love the various cooking magazines in Mexico. You find things there you just don't find elsewhere. Only time I've ever seen a recipe for your normal every day picadillo was in such a magazine, eg. If you look in any big name Mexican cookbook, you'll get complex fillings for chiles en nogada, but that's about it. The magazines have what people actually eat on a daily basis, dishes that I think cookbook authors often find too commonplace to include.

 

btw, there was a great catalog of chiles in one of the editions of the Mexican archeology magazine. That will get some use. There was also an edition of the travel magazine dedicated to food trips.

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Scott at DallasFood.org had been joking that someday the iguana volume was going to be worth a lot of money. So on this last trip to DF I bought every volume I could find. On my return layover at DFW, I handed him a package with 20 copies. It has to be nearly every copy in Mexico City.

 

Picked up A LOT of books on this last trip. Now have all but volumes 17 & 21 of the Indigena y Popular series, 54 of the 56 volumes. Still missing a good number of the Familiar series, though I picked up a copy of Sonora, which I really wanted. The northern states don't get much play in most Mexican cookbooks.

 

They were doing this great series for the bicentennial where they had a magazine of recipes organized by state. Most of the states weren't available in DF, but a lot of the big name states were and I picked up several. Lots of magazines overall. I always love the various cooking magazines in Mexico. You find things there you just don't find elsewhere. Only time I've ever seen a recipe for your normal every day picadillo was in such a magazine, eg. If you look in any big name Mexican cookbook, you'll get complex fillings for chiles en nogada, but that's about it. The magazines have what people actually eat on a daily basis, dishes that I think cookbook authors often find too commonplace to include.

 

btw, there was a great catalog of chiles in one of the editions of the Mexican archeology magazine. That will get some use. There was also an edition of the travel magazine dedicated to food trips.

 

Although I'm trying to be a good sport about this, and be happy for you without reservation, I'm really jealous.

 

Really.

 

Harumphf.

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Scott at DallasFood.org had been joking that someday the iguana volume was going to be worth a lot of money. So on this last trip to DF I bought every volume I could find. On my return layover at DFW, I handed him a package with 20 copies. It has to be nearly every copy in Mexico City.

 

Picked up A LOT of books on this last trip. Now have all but volumes 17 & 21 of the Indigena y Popular series, 54 of the 56 volumes. Still missing a good number of the Familiar series, though I picked up a copy of Sonora, which I really wanted. The northern states don't get much play in most Mexican cookbooks.

 

They were doing this great series for the bicentennial where they had a magazine of recipes organized by state. Most of the states weren't available in DF, but a lot of the big name states were and I picked up several. Lots of magazines overall. I always love the various cooking magazines in Mexico. You find things there you just don't find elsewhere. Only time I've ever seen a recipe for your normal every day picadillo was in such a magazine, eg. If you look in any big name Mexican cookbook, you'll get complex fillings for chiles en nogada, but that's about it. The magazines have what people actually eat on a daily basis, dishes that I think cookbook authors often find too commonplace to include.

 

btw, there was a great catalog of chiles in one of the editions of the Mexican archeology magazine. That will get some use. There was also an edition of the travel magazine dedicated to food trips.

 

Although I'm trying to be a good sport about this, and be happy for you without reservation, I'm really jealous.

 

Really.

 

Harumphf.

And just to add a little picante to your pique: Señor Extramsg and I got to spend a terrific afternoon and evening together in Morelia, eating everything that wasn't nailed down. What fun!

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