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Do you know about luggage?


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You know TravelPro luggage has a lifetime warranty, right? If you kill it, they'll fix it. Really, we've done it many times over.

 

Also, if you're a member of the auto club, see if your local AAA affiliate sells luggage. We got our TravelPro bags at the Washington State AAA at very steep discounts.

Rilly? I thought that only related to manufacturing defects, not the "wear and tear." Which is certainly the issue in my (suit)case.

 

Sadly, not a member of AAA, and neither is spouse. I don't even have a driver's license... :unsure:

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Some good thoughts here. One point: over the years I've bought several hanging bags. I like hanging bags. It's nice to be able to have things that aren't totally wrinkled when you arrive. But damned if everyone of them hasn't failed at the hanging point. Something happens. Either they get thrashed by baggage handlers, or I overload them with too many items, or the rubber around the holder starts to deteriorate or something. Think twice before going for a hanging bag.

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The samsonite gugl linked to has a fairly decent mechanism for folding clothes, in the front compartment. You can even get a suit in the carry on, and it arrives in good shape. It also includes a bunch of different bags, which tends to also keep stuff from getting wrinkled.

 

As far as repairs, keep in mind that if a handle or wheel breaks off, oftentimes the airline will either pay for it for send it for repair at their expense. Our samsonite basically lost the brand-name tag off the front at some point, but is otherwise healthy. We're talking trans atlantic at least three times per year, asia once or twice per year, across US or across Europe several times per year, for the past 7 years. (My life is not that impressive, but in combination A and I do put in a lot of miles.)

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This is just a little record of my experience. It is by no means a recommendation. Since 1999, I've lived about half my life out of suitcases.

 

The first time I left here to spend three months on the road (a circuitous Flint - Chicago - Kansas City - New York - Paris - Detroit jaunt, with stops in all those places and numerous plane changes) I had two mainly new American Tourister suitcases, a big one (thirty inches, I think) and a twenty-one incher. They had wheels and I dragged them around like crippled dogs,. I also had a good-sized leather backpack from Wilson's, to go onboard the planes with me, for books, papers, and my laptop computer. And ziplock bags, the light traveler's friend.

 

By the time I got to New York I knew the enormity I'd committed, and I haven't forgot it.

 

When I finally got home to Flint, the two suitcases were wrecks, having been kicked from plane to plane, thrown into elevators and train baggage racks, and bounced down cobbled streets and the starewells in cheap hotels. The backpack had come through like a champ.

 

From that point on, I've used two twenty-one inchers with wheels and telescoping handles, the cheapest I could find on sale, fifteen or twenty dollars, less if I got them at a Goodwill or Salvation Army store. I don't remember the brand names of any of them. It doesn't matter. They are merely disposable commodities. When one broke in Paris, I picked another up at one of those schlock shops near the porte de Cligancourt, places where 21" suitcases are marked 19 Euros, you offer the guy12 and finally pay15. And have an interesting sociological experience with a shifty-eyed Corsican.

 

I still have the backpack and it goes with me everywhere. Best travel accessory I've ever owned. Aside from the Ziplocks.

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From that point on, I've used two twenty-one inchers with wheels and telescoping handles, the cheapest I could find on sale, fifteen or twenty dollars, less if I got them at a Goodwill or Salvation Army store. I don't remember the brand names of any of them. It doesn't matter. They are merely disposable commodities.

There's something in the conventional vacationing/business trip experience that resists the disposable concept, but I think it's valid (if somewhat environmentally incorrect) and cost effective.

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As far as repairs, keep in mind that if a handle or wheel breaks off, oftentimes the airline will either pay for it for send it for repair at their expense.

Returning from Chicago, I noticed several prominent notices on the luggage carousel stating explicitly that the airline was not responsible for projections such as wheels (I don't remember a mention of handles but it might have included those too). New policy?

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Maybe. Also, American airline companies tend to be bastards. Even so, while you are supposed to take off the detachable straps, if they break a regular handle they should fix it. As far as wheels, the European carrier fixed them for us once (A's India trip I think) but the policy may have changed. It is sometimes worth checking, even though it can be a hassle.

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You know TravelPro luggage has a lifetime warranty, right? If you kill it, they'll fix it. Really, we've done it many times over.

Rilly? I thought that only related to manufacturing defects, not the "wear and tear." Which is certainly the issue in my (suit)case.

True, although for $25 you can upgarde your warranty to cover wear-and-tear.

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Dunno if I can get behind the cheap-ass disposable suitcase.

 

My life changed forever when Mr. Scorched bought me my first set of good luggage to celebrate my new travel-writing job. Unlike when I traveled with crappy wheeled suitcases bought at Target or Marshall's, I no longer have to drag anything -- my suitcase just rolls along smoothly, and I arrive with my rotator cuff intact.

 

To me, the ergonomics of the brand-name bags and their easy-packing features --like trifold suit-keepers, plastic-lined toiletry pouches, and rear pockets sized for ticket folios -- make them well worth the cost.

 

They also last a lot longer than the shite ones: I still have those two pieces -- purchased September 2001 -- and use them regularly.

 

~A

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I once bought a cheap-ass suitcase while business travelling in Manila. I only needed it to last for the trip home. But it wasn't that the wheels lasted one trip, it was that they fell off during. Instead of rolling my brand new bag through the airport and down the sidewalk, I was forced to drag it. Never again.

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Tumi is my luggage of choice and there was a time where I had a serious Tumi addiction. They were made like a brick shithouse.

 

I bought my honeymoon luggage at Altman's 37.5 years ago. That was Samsonite and it's long gone. Then I went on a Hartmann kick and way back when, it was very well made. Not so well made now, IMO.

 

I'm a Tumi girl but I think there's even better stuff now although I don't travel that often so I haven't made a thorough search of what's the best of this moment but you can't go wrong with Tumi.

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When I went to China to adopt my neice 6 years ago, I didn't want to bring my heavy, expensiive, cumbersome, name brand ( think goat cheese) luggage for the kind of travelling we would be doing. I bought two great bags at LL Bean...sedate neutral houndstooth, well constructed, and durable. Since that trip, I've chosen to use thme them a number of times over the Coach stuff. I'm pretty sure they were under $200 for both..they are not soft sided, they do have structure, and one bag is 30", the other maybe 20". the larger has wheels, the smaller has long leather handles, so you can wheel one and toss the other over your shoulder. the smaller one has garment bag features as well, flexible yet structured enough to not be floppy.

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I love my Briggs & Riley luggage. I don't travel as much as some other members who have posted in this thread, but I get around some. I've had my bags for nearly a decade now and they show almost no signs of wear and tear. And I can pack a suit in my big wheeled bag and have it arrive in wearable condition (after a hang in the bathroom during a shower).

 

Also, this from their website:

If your Briggs & Riley bag is ever broken or damaged, even if it was caused by an airline, we will repair it free of charge. Simple as that!

An even better sign: I've never had to take them up on it.

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