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We gambled on this relative newcomer from the proprietor of Beppe for a light supper, and were relieved to find, beyond the spaghetti Western gimmicks, some straightforwardly appealing food.

 

What was described on the menu as a "Sloppy Guiseppe" turned out to be crunchy, toasted country bread, piled high not with chicken livers, as one might find at a traditional trattoria, but with braised oxtail. My only complaint was that I could have eaten more of it. Fingers of firm polenta, flavored with seafood, came with a fresh and spicy tomato dip. The flat pasta with wild boar ragu was a big hit - large, juicy chunks of meat, and I thought the spinach fettucine with ground pork was fine too.

 

We couldn't resist an order of "Rocky Mountain Oysters" to share: they are crisply breadcrumbed and fried, well seasoned but balanced by a cool, creamy dill dipping sauce. I wonder if they sell many?

 

The wine list is composed of moderately priced Tusan country wines, not one of which was remotely familiar. With a shared dessert, the check was sixty dollars a head, all-included - but we didn't get into the entrees.

 

Unfortunately, Maremma pulls off the trick of being noisy without any music, and without even being full. Other than that, it's a pleasant option.

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  • 4 months later...

What was described on the menu as a "Sloppy Guiseppe" turned out to be crunchy, toasted country bread, piled high not with chicken livers, as one might find at a traditional trattoria, but with braised oxtail. My only complaint was that I could have eaten more of it.

couldn't agree more. delicious and with a spicy kick. stopped by for a light dinner last night which turned into a bit of an orgy - we told the chef (whom we've known for years) that we started eating meat and it got pretty crazy. in addition to the oxtail, we had his signature heirloom bean salad and green salad with pancetta scrambled eggs, then lardo with rosemary (from his own pigs upstate), lamb meatballs, pork sausage with white beans, tagliatelle with pork ragu... all delicious. oh, and desserts (although i only had a bite of each - too full), some prosecco and earthy Tuscan reds. i love going to restaurants in the summer - it's quieter, easy to get a table w/o planning and you get a lot more attention :huh:

 

i recently saw an old menu for the Chianina beef they do seasonally but can't locate it - does nayone have/seen? i think it's got a tartare or it and fiorentina...

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Unfortunately, Maremma pulls off the trick of being noisy without any music, and without even being full. Other than that, it's a pleasant option.

 

on the subject of noisy, I think my bar is set at the Cornelia Street Cafe (does anyone remember them?) where it was so loud I could barely hear myself think.

 

large room, wooden furniture, wooden floors and nothing to absorb sound.

 

food was eh. an unpleasant memory it shall remain.

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We couldn't resist an order of "Rocky Mountain Oysters" to share: they are crisply breadcrumbed and fried, well seasoned but balanced by a cool, creamy dill dipping sauce. I wonder if they sell many?

 

Not on the menu, as of a few weeks ago (Lemma: restaurants with names ending with the letter a will initially serve offal, but will later take it off the menu - Onera, Parea, Maremma...), but the rest of the food as described by you and nux, maybe a bit overspiced/salted, but tasty.

 

p.s. I can only describe the portion size of the Sloppy Guiseppe as cruel.

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yup, i was disapppointed to see those were gone (although i bet husband was relieved). no wimpy seasoning for cowboys! but you are so right about the size...

 

it wasn't noisy the night we were there but it wasn't full. the dining room is actually quite small, there is another floor that's bigger and barer so i can see how it might be when busy. there was music, very low (and the selection a little sleepy at times). The worst noise offenders for me: A Voce and Momofuku. Oppressive.

 

By the way, i just got an email that chianina beef will be served Aug. 22-25 - has anyone tried this type of beef here or in Italy? i think i might want to try it

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Heat, which is a pretty entertaining read has a large section dedicated to a Tuscan butcher - Dario. He is

the same man that trained Batali's father. Chianina cows also play a large part. Wonder if the beef will

be coming from Dario's shop? According to the book, people travel from all over the world to get his cuts and he is selective in whom he sells to.

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Oddly enough, as "Heat" progresses one of the main characters (Maestro) spends 2 full pages describing why Chianina cows are no longer desirable for their meat. In short, they no longer work the fields which gave their meat an unusually firm texture and lean consistency. That said, Ill give Cesar the benefit of the doubt.

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