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the ethics of factory farming and foie gras


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I have an odd connection with Gary Danko, though I've never eaten at his joint or met him. GD and I are from the same desolate small town and High School (though some years apart), and my brother-in-law's oldest daughter (by his first wife) was GD's Senior Prom date. FWIW, my BIL's assessment is that GD is a little light in his loafers (can we be sued for that?)

 

It was interesting and I'm glad I went. I had a fine time but I think I'm not all that into "fine dining".

[Here we go again, or Why I am a Legacy Participant at eGullet]

 

I would think that you have to be in "fine dining" mode to convince yourself that the pleasures of eating foie gras justify the means used to produce it.

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Or as another supplier phrased it, "Our animals have only one bad day in their lives."

If you are going to kill something, be nice about it.

yes, it follows that we should get rid of animal cruelty laws.

FWIW, my BIL's assessment is that GD is a little light in his loafers (can we be sued for that?)

You can't get sued but who cares? I mean, other than his prom date.

 

[Here we go again, or Why I am a Legacy Participant at eGullet]

 

I would think that you have to be in "fine dining" mode to convince yourself that the pleasures of eating foie gras justify the means used to produce it.

 

You know I LOVE you in a way words can not express. It's futile to try.

 

I know you are a fan of farmers markets where farmers do not participate. I assume you shop a lot in Chinatown where the pork is from factories rather than farms. This is your right and I'm not going to argue that with you about it. (I apologize in advance if you insist on humane, farm-raised pork)

 

 

I will also grant you that fois gras production is troublesome, to say the least. That is why we have several years here in California to sort it out and come to some kind of solution.

 

But nothing in fois gras production (which is minuscule) compares to what your factory-farmed pig endures to end up as a cheap cutlet on your plate.

 

Now let's have a BIG HUG and concentrate on the things we can agree on.

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I know you are a fan of farmers markets where farmers do not participate. I assume you shop a lot in Chinatown where the pork is from factories rather than farms.

I can tell you that my wife does not have diseased organs on her shopping list, even organs with human-engineered pathological conditions. I have no idea where Yosemite Meats buys their hogs, but I know that in Chinatown the priorities are on freshness and as natural a flavor as possible, which is why virtually all the chickens are from Petaluma Poultry (but you probably have a problem with them too). Other than those qualities and the absence of any perceptible pathological conditions, we could care less where the critters went to boarding school. (Does anybody wonder if you treat your beans humanely?)

 

I realize that you might have a vested interest in bashing meat producers (or maybe you just genuinely imagine them all as a bunch of wild-eyed Pythagoreans), but even after the nth rewrite of "The Jungle," people still eat common barnyard meats; I wonder what the effect of even one best-selling book on foie gras production would do to that industry. A single ray of sunlight of the subject would probably close the books on the practice faster than all the EU White papers have been able to do.

 

As John Burton said, "Fuck Wolfgang Puck; save Donald Duck."

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I can tell you that my wife does not have diseased organs on her shopping list, even organs with human-engineered pathological conditions.

Why does a change in tissue structure caused in vivo revolt you (if that's what you're saying) when even more radical changes caused ex vivo (by cooking) do not? :P

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I know you are a fan of farmers markets where farmers do not participate. I assume you shop a lot in Chinatown where the pork is from factories rather than farms.

I can tell you that my wife does not have diseased organs on her shopping list, even organs with human-engineered pathological conditions. I have no idea where Yosemite Meats buys their hogs, but I know that in Chinatown the priorities are on freshness and as natural a flavor as possible, which is why virtually all the chickens are from Petaluma Poultry (but you probably have a problem with them too). Other than those qualities and the absence of any perceptible pathological conditions, we could care less where the critters went to boarding school. (Does anybody wonder if you treat your beans humanely?)

 

I realize that you might have a vested interest in bashing meat producers (or maybe you just genuinely imagine them all as a bunch of wild-eyed Pythagoreans), but even after the nth rewrite of "The Jungle," people still eat common barnyard meats; I wonder what the effect of even one best-selling book on foie gras production would do to that industry. A single ray of sunlight of the subject would probably close the books on the practice faster than all the EU White papers have been able to do.

 

As John Burton said, "Fuck Wolfgang Puck; save Donald Duck."

Pee on me!

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I can tell you that my wife does not have diseased organs on her shopping list, even organs with human-engineered pathological conditions.

Why does a change in tissue structure caused in vivo revolt you (if that's what you're saying) when even more radical changes caused ex vivo (by cooking) do not? :P

I'm 50 years away from my high school Latin, but I think in vivo means "still alive', in which case I do cannot comprehend your perplexity at all.

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I can tell you that my wife does not have diseased organs on her shopping list, even organs with human-engineered pathological conditions.

Why does a change in tissue structure caused in vivo revolt you (if that's what you're saying) when even more radical changes caused ex vivo (by cooking) do not? :P

I'm 50 years away from my high school Latin, but I think in vivo means "still alive', in which case I do cannot comprehend your perplexity at all.

Maybe I misunderstand you, but your objection to foie gras seems to be that it is an abnormal liver. (That, incidentally, is questionable but I'll leave the point moot.) However, everything cooked or dried or pickled is abnormal. So what's the difference?

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