Jump to content
g.johnson

Eleven Madison Park

Recommended Posts

I look at it quite selfishly. When restaurants are aware that I am a food blogger, the service is sometimes better, and it is certainly never worse. I never walk into a place and introduce myself as a food blogger, but if they happen to know (however they may know it), it can only be to my advantage. So, what the heck, if they want to google me before I dine there, let them have at it.

 

Anything you put on the Internet under your own name is going to be googled by strangers. Get over it, or don't put the stuff out there.

Yep.

 

That last sentence gets to the nub. There's a world of difference between people "ferreting out" facts about you which you've sought to keep confidential. If you post those facts publicly, they're fair game.

 

Assume that anything you've posted publicly, under your real name, is known to everyone you deal with. If the restaurant is bothering itself with irrelevancies, that's the restaurant's problem.

Yep.

 

I'm curious why several people have said it's "creepy" for other people to look at content they've deliberately chosen to make public.

 

I can't see that. I mean, if they're printing out your LinkedIn profile and making a collage for their bathroom wall, yeah, but...

Yep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Next time there's an acquittal for a high-profile murder case, I'm booking at EMP under the defendant's name.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm curious why several people have said it's "creepy" for other people to look at content they've deliberately chosen to make public.

 

I can't see that. I mean, if they're printing out your LinkedIn profile and making a collage for their bathroom wall, yeah, but...

 

You might feel differently if your name was Susan Suarez. Lots of lovely and respectable people have that name.

 

And then there's this one.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NXwE9Fe0oJ8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although I don't have an issue with it, I am not exactly sure how this knowledge helps them (in the typical case).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what is a restaurant learning from my LinkedIn that is germane. Hmm. I wonder.

The article gave examples, didn't it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a Linked-In profile or any social media accounts. The only thing I've put out on the internet about myself is my firm's page about me on its web site.

 

So (other than my page on my firm's website) whatever there is about me on the internet isn't stuff I've put there, but stuff other people are reporting about me. And I think it's creepy for a restaurant to look for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not being difficult, but I still wonder why it's "creepy."

 

I regularly look for information online about people I'm planning to do business with. Is that strange? Creepy, even? If I was looking for someone in your line of work Sneak, I'd probably google you before hiring you.

 

Is it specifically creepy for restaurants to do this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it's specifically creepy for a restaurant to do this. It's not germane to the business they're going to do with me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wilf, my issue is with the context. I don't have a problem with doing research on a person - in my job, I do it frequently. It's expected. I would never go into a meeting with a person without researching them first. But, when it comes to my dining in a restaurant, my bio should have no impact whatsoever on the service I receive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But it may be germane in the case of some guests. They don't know until they look, do they?

But I have to say the level of germaneness in general seems so low that I doubt restaurants are spending much time on this. I can believe they google names they think they recognize.

 

Blovie: But it totally will if you turn out to be a visiting chef, for example.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it's specifically creepy for a restaurant to do this. It's not germane to the business they're going to do with me.

 

Maybe my definition of "creepy" is different from others'. I don't find this online client profiling creepy, necessarily. I find it disingenuous. Part of feeling "special" at a restaurant is the fact that there is a natural and organic rapport and familiarity between the staff and the client, one that is sometimes developed over multiple visits, and rarely over one, brief encounter. Walking into a restaurant and having the staff know certain public information about me is unlikely going to make me feel special. Almost the opposite, it's going to make me feel like just another Google-able person.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't recall objecting to being profiled and given special treatment by airlines when I was a very frequent flier. Similarly hotels when I traveled on business all the time.

 

Restaurants are just catching up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...