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I've been a couple of times before and although perfectly ok I found it pretty ho hum; neither as exciting as a top tier restaurant (the Danny Meyer effect) nor as satisfying as a decent bistro. But a

I look forward to the next iteration, when he transforms it into the first NFT restaurant, with menus of Non-Food Tokens for 500 Ethereum. You sit at a table and look at pictures of food and wine bott

Then Goldilocks cried out, "Someone's been playing with my FOOD!"

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(I do have to repeat, however, that nothing in that write-up made me think they limit the information they search to the extent Wilfrid assumes.)

 

 

All I'm assuming is that this is being done in the course of business, and not by someone who wants to personally stalk you. It's common practice for businesses to use social media, among other tools, to evaluate clients' expectations and needs. If restaurants have just started doing it, they're late to the game.

 

I haven't seen anyone say they're creeped out by status-based airline or hotel upgrades yet. Any takers?

 

because those upgrades are based on business that I or my employer does with the airline or the hotel chain.

 

 

Not any more. You can get special treatment by complaining--or indeed by a being a strong brand advocate--online.

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(But it's not really going to affect people with zero social media profile, Sneak. There's plenty of low-hanging fruit out there.)

What makes you say that? There's plenty of stuff out there about non-social media participants, and it's plenty easy to find.

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That's exactly what businesses are spending a lot of money trying to do.

 

A premium hotel would love to be able to set the music playing in your room when you arrive according to your social media preferences.

I think many people would find this creepy.

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(But it's not really going to affect people with zero social media profile, Sneak. There's plenty of low-hanging fruit out there.)

What makes you say that? There's plenty of stuff out there about non-social media participants, and it's plenty easy to find.

 

 

I guarantee you that businesses practicing social media analysis to anticipate customers needs are going to start with inhouse data, and are then going to look at LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

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(I do have to repeat, however, that nothing in that write-up made me think they limit the information they search to the extent Wilfrid assumes.)

 

 

All I'm assuming is that this is being done in the course of business, and not by someone who wants to personally stalk you. It's common practice for businesses to use social media, among other tools, to evaluate clients' expectations and needs. If restaurants have just started doing it, they're late to the game.

 

I haven't seen anyone say they're creeped out by status-based airline or hotel upgrades yet. Any takers?

 

because those upgrades are based on business that I or my employer does with the airline or the hotel chain.

 

 

Not any more. You can get special treatment by complaining--or indeed by a being a strong brand advocate--online.

 

? Not if I don't ever say anything.

 

If you are a "brand advocate" on twitter you are tacitly acknowledging you are cool with people recognizing you.

 

I have a linkedin profile simply because its weird for people who do what I do (and market to a very narrow niche that I market to) not to have one. I'm not engaging with anyone over it

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(But it's not really going to affect people with zero social media profile, Sneak. There's plenty of low-hanging fruit out there.)

What makes you say that? There's plenty of stuff out there about non-social media participants, and it's plenty easy to find.

 

I guarantee you that businesses practicing social media analysis to anticipate customers needs are going to start with inhouse data, and are then going to look at LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

 

Again, this is about EMP in particular, and there is not a whiff of a hint of a clue that they limit their research that way. To the contrary, there is every indication that they don't. (Look at the passage Lex quoted again.)

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I don't want to make anyone here an example, but I think I'd have to do some serious digging to find out anything about Sneak except his face, job, and a few career highlights.

 

If it's suggested that businesses are doing deep searches to trawl the Internet for data about people who really have little or no social media presence, then I admit that's weird. But it's not what I'm talking about.

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I have a linkedin profile simply because its weird for people who do what I do (and market to a very narrow niche that I market to) not to have one. I'm not engaging with anyone over it

 

 

It's published. You're engaging with whoever has permission to see it.

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yes I appreciate that, but the information is not germane to someone serving me a meal.

 

I'm guessing I could find out lots of things about lots of people online - especially if I'm willing to spend 50 bucks. I don't. It simply doesn't matter to me where Sneak went to law school, nor does it matter to EMP

 

Its not a question of "is the information freely available to me" its "Do I need to know this information" and the sort of things EMP is doing - -they simply don't need to know.

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Anyone can Google some names and faces, but Roller is going deeper. "I'm looking for chef's whites and wine glasses," he says. A shot of a guest wearing whites means a chef is probably coming to dinner. Wine glasses signify a potential sommelier (or at least a wine geek). This is just the beginning. If, for example, Roller discovers it's a couple's anniversary, he'll then try to figure out which anniversary. If it's a birthday, he'll welcome a guest, as they walk in the door, with a "Happy Birthday." (Or, if it seems to Roller that a guest prefers to keep a low profile, "I'll let them introduce themselves to me," he says.) Even small details are useful: "If I find out a guest is from Montana, and I know we have a server from there, we'll put them together." Same goes for guests who own jazz clubs, who can be paired with a sommelier that happens to be into jazz. In other words, before customers even step through the door, the restaurant's staff has a pretty good idea of the things it can do to specifically blow their minds.

I think this is pretty much what I described. If Roller is subscribing to search sites, or trying to guess passwords, or using spear phishing to find out birthdays, that's a whole different story.

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