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Mark Bittman of the NY Times offers his views on the Ferry Building, its shops, and its market. He's very impressed.

 

And great desserts, and supremely rich hot chocolate. And good French press coffee.

 

Much more, too: the stuff that makes a menu great. It's straightforward but cooked with care and, dare I say it, love.

 

The shop also sells ingredients, and most of them are delicious: wild pine nuts, near-ideal eggs, schmaltz (outside of New York!), amazing marzipan, house-made English muffins.

 

And there is, or was on a morning last month, the best breakfast dish I've had in, um, maybe ever. It consisted of freshly made yogurt from local organic milk; hand-rolled couscous (something I thought only Paula Wolfert was nutty enough to tackle); house-made harissa, brick-red and only mildly spicy; and two of those eggs, perfectly poached. Presumably, there was some local butter in there as well. This was a creation that made me happy not only to be in Northern California but just plain alive.

 

Terminal

 

Ferry Building's own site

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I am pleased he wrote such nice things about Boulette's Larder, which is one of my favorite places on earth.

 

Also, the term "ecologically-farmed" on the Slanted Door's menu means that the farmers do not choose to pay the costly fees to CCOF (California Certified Organic Farming) to be "certified," and are farming sustainably. These farmers often have more exacting standards than the CCOF, anyway. Andrew Griffin, of Mariquita Farm, supplies Slanted Door and dozens of other Bay area restaurants, and he won't pay the fee. People who know him, trust him.

 

Ferry Plaza's website is wonderful. You can roll your mouse over a map and see what's where. Ingenious.

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I found this quote somewhat offensive:

What Mr. Phan is doing right is pretty much what he set out to do: elevate Asian cuisine to the level of European.
The cuisine(s) of Asia can stand side by side with the cuisine(s) of Europe in terms of worth, IMHO.

 

Perhaps someone can explain to me what defines the "level" of European cuisine if not only the numbers on that little piece of paper presented to the diner at the end of the meal.

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I found this quote somewhat offensive:The cuisine(s) of Asia can stand side by side with the cuisine(s) of Europe in terms of worth, IMHO.

 

Perhaps someone can explain to me what defines the "level" of European cuisine if not only the numbers on that little piece of paper presented to the diner at the end of the meal.

 

Saying this over here is liking striking out the pitcher. Let me see you say it over on OA, tough guy.

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Also, the term "ecologically-farmed" on the Slanted Door's menu means that the farmers do not choose to pay the costly fees to CCOF (California Certified Organic Farming) to be "certified," and are farming sustainably. These farmers often have more exacting standards than the CCOF, anyway.

 

Tana, this is an important point, but one which is often misunderstood.

 

For it to be fully true, the buyer needs to trust the farmer. Unscrupulous farmers or middle-persons could misrepresent or plain out lie about their practices if that trust isn't maintained.

 

We have the same issue in NJ. For some farmers, the costs of certification far outweigh the expected premium for organic merchandise.

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