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Painting Wood Furniture


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So, the end tables are bare wood? Consider the color you want to have on them before you proceed...I used to begin everything with primer, but maybe you want it darker, in which case add some paint to your primer, so you don't have to start out with white, and cover with a dark color....

 

Another thing primer rules out is this cool stuff I haven't tried, but seen...Colored, as in turquise and iris and forest green, stains from Minwax...I saw some furniture that had the bottoms done in that, and just decorative painting on the top...

 

 

And, of course, there's that nasty sanding....

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Of course, if you're doing white, you might wannah consider eschewing primer, and going with a coat or two of Navajo white semi-gloss, wiped off to show the wood in various areas, then "tea-stained" with a brownish glaze or wash over it....

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Yep, Navajo white is just my favorite all-purpose white, a creamy off-white...and by tea-stained, Omni got it right; like the stuff I've done to make clothes look aged, or not as bright..

 

Are you aiming for the distressed look of the wood work that your land-lady installed? To do that, I'd probably try a color, then that crackle stuff,then white. The crackle makes what's over it all scaley, and aliigator-y, and then you could do a wash, or a glaze over it with a brown, or a grey, to make it look even more aged.

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Is Navajo white just the name of a color? And tea stained is what? A glaze?

 

Navaho White is a neutral color used in just about ever new condo in LA until a few years ago when earth tones broke out. Navaho White makes the room look bigger and brighter. Some prefer Dunn Edwards' Swiss Coffee--it's less in the beige scale and more toward the white.

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Is Navajo white just the name of a color? And tea stained is what? A glaze?

 

Navaho White is a neutral color used in just about ever new condo in LA until a few years ago when earth tones broke out. Navaho White makes the room look bigger and brighter. Some prefer Dunn Edwards' Swiss Coffee--it's less in the beige scale and more toward the white.

 

 

I did notice that some of the west coast paint companies had totally different Navajo whites when I helped a friend pick colors...I always make sure to use Benjamon Moore Navajo....

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Are you aiming for the distressed look of the wood work that your land-lady installed? To do that, I'd probably try a color, then that crackle stuff,then white. The crackle makes what's over it all scaley, and aliigator-y, and then you could do a wash, or a glaze over it with a brown, or a grey, to make it look even more aged.

 

I'm not going for the crackle look just yet. Baby steps. Yesterday I did my first layer and I decided to be a little nutty and do white on one table and brick on the other. Whoooweee.

 

I don't understand why I need a primer if the wood has polyurethane on it. Why can't I just proceed as I did with the raw wood? I'm pretty certain the paint will go on as it did with the raw wood.

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I don't understand why I need a primer if the wood has polyurethane on it. Why can't I just proceed as I did with the raw wood? I'm pretty certain the paint will go on as it did with the raw wood.

 

I don't think it will. On top of polyurethane I'd recommend a high adhesive primer before you do anything else. I've done some painting of furniture and especially with acrylic or laytex paint you'd need to prime.

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Not necessarily. If you have the time what you can do is paint a patch, let it dry and then see if you can just scrape it off with your fingernail (bad sign). I'm not saying this is foolproof, just a possible suggestion to get a sense of your situation.

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You definitely, definitely need a primer over the polyeurethane. Otherwise the paint will not stick. You need that special maximum adhesive primer I was telling you about (which is probably what Rose is talking about too). Just because the paint might seem to go on fine...that's not the test. The test is in a little while down the road, when it comes right off the polyeurethane. Polyeurethane's raison d'etre is to keep things from sticking to it.

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