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Painting Wood Furniture


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If you're going to paint over the polyeurethane, make sure you sand, sand, sand, before you put anything on it...I've never heard of the hi-stick primer, but it doesn't sound like a bad idea...

 

Primer AND sanding? I'm not going to lie to you, that ain't gonna happen.

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If you're going to paint over the polyeurethane, make sure you sand, sand, sand, before you put anything on it...I've never heard of the hi-stick primer, but it doesn't sound like a bad idea...

 

Primer AND sanding? I'm not going to lie to you, that ain't gonna happen.

Well, you can do it now, or do it over again later, when you realize your paint won't go on smoothly.. :)

 

I'm not kidding here. Sanding is your friends; I'm talking a light overall roughing up, with fine sandpaper, to get the paint to stick, not heavy duty sanding...I'd go so far as to say it's more important than priming... :) Of course, I do both; I discovered it makes my efforts look much better, for less work...

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If I test it and the paint goes on fine, can I proceed? (Yes, I'm feeling lazy and cheap.)

Of course. It might work fine. But it's very hard to get anything to stick to poly. You may find flakes of paint falling off in the future. If you don't mind that minor risk, give it a shot.

 

Sanding creates nooks and crannies for the paint to grab onto. Like scrambled eggs grabbing into scratchmarks on your teflon. Just get a sheet of 180 grit and rub lightly over the whole thing. You're not trying to remove the poly, just scuff it up a bit.

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If I test it and the paint goes on fine, can I proceed? (Yes, I'm feeling lazy and cheap.)

Of course. It might work fine. But it's very hard to get anything to stick to poly. You may find flakes of paint falling off in the future. If you don't mind that minor risk, give it a shot.

 

Sanding creates nooks and crannies for the paint to grab onto. Like scrambled eggs grabbing into scratchmarks on your teflon. Just get a sheet of 180 grit and rub lightly over the whole thing. You're not trying to remove the poly, just scuff it up a bit.

It may even stick while you're painting it, and after...Then, when you just scrape a fingernail over it, when it's dry(and you can't wipe it off, or start over), it'll come right off...Then you'll mbe pissed, and have to start again...and you may even have to sand the remaining paint off!

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I've got a problem. I did as I was told and I sanded AND primed! But in some places where the primer is really thick, I can scrape it off. I have a feeling that you're going to tell me that I have to sand off this shit and start over again.

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I've got a problem. I did as I was told and I sanded AND primed! But in some places where the primer is really thick, I can scrape it off. I have a feeling that you're going to tell me that I have to sand off this shit and start over again.

 

Thin coats of primer are best. Are you sure it's totally dry? This humidity may slow things up.

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It might not have been dry. So do I have to worry about the thick parts and should I do anything?

 

If it were me (and I AM about to start on a piece that's polyeurethaned.... :blush: ), I'd give it a few more days....No need to redo something if you don't have to....

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