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Painting Wood Furniture


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It might not have been dry. So do I have to worry about the thick parts and should I do anything?

 

If it were me (and I AM about to start on a piece that's polyeurethaned.... :blush: ), I'd give it a few more days....No need to redo something if you don't have to....

 

You were right, I jumped the gun. All is well.

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There used to be a product called "sand-eze" that you brushed on like paint, only it intentionally roughed up the prior finish so that a new coat would stick. It used to be a real timesaver, but I don't know if it also worked on poly. Worth asking your paint man.

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Question: I'm painting wooden kitchen cabinets and someone told me that I need to wash them down with a TSP based product. This junk looks awfully toxic and quite frankly I don't want to add another step, especially if it is unnecessary. I think he's thinking that I need to wash off the oily kitchen dirt to prime the surface but I took off the cabinet doors so the inside (where I'm actually painting) is not especially dirty. Can I just do as I've done previously: sand and then use a primer?

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Question: I'm painting wooden kitchen cabinets and someone told me that I need to wash them down with a TSP based product. This junk looks awfully toxic and quite frankly I don't want to add another step, especially if it is unnecessary. I think he's thinking that I need to wash off the oily kitchen dirt to prime the surface but I took off the cabinet doors so the inside (where I'm actually painting) is not especially dirty. Can I just do as I've done previously: sand and then use a primer?

I would still scrub with something before you sand; nothing worse than sanding off dirt. I like to use those coarse green, nylon scrubbies you buy at Chinese grocery stores (well, you can buy them anywhere, but they cost less there...) I think I may have just used Murphy's oil soap or Fantastic last time, I don't remember...

TSP isn't necessary,although come to think of it, I may have used it....You are not allowed to save a step, sorry. Now that you own it, you have to do everything right... :D

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Question: I'm painting wooden kitchen cabinets and someone told me that I need to wash them down with a TSP based product. This junk looks awfully toxic and quite frankly I don't want to add another step, especially if it is unnecessary. I think he's thinking that I need to wash off the oily kitchen dirt to prime the surface but I took off the cabinet doors so the inside (where I'm actually painting) is not especially dirty. Can I just do as I've done previously: sand and then use a primer?

One of the main reasons that people use TSP is to take the oils from the surface and to even knock a bit of the surface from glossy paints. Often people do this instead of sanding. If you are planning on sanding the surfaces, I don't think there is any need for the TSP.

 

Note that for kitchens, you might want to go with some of the specialty primers that provide quite a bit better adhesion to glossy/oily surfaces just in case your sanding isn't perfect. I've used Zinsser Bull's Eye many times and find it to do a great job of holding to surfaces and has the added benefit of being a terrific stain-blocker. Not cheap but I believe it is worth it. (Note that if you use the Zinsser it's best to do it on a day when you can open the windows. It is an acrylic product but it has some ammonia smell.)

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Question: I'm painting wooden kitchen cabinets and someone told me that I need to wash them down with a TSP based product. This junk looks awfully toxic and quite frankly I don't want to add another step, especially if it is unnecessary. I think he's thinking that I need to wash off the oily kitchen dirt to prime the surface but I took off the cabinet doors so the inside (where I'm actually painting) is not especially dirty. Can I just do as I've done previously: sand and then use a primer?

One of the main reasons that people use TSP is to take the oils from the surface and to even knock a bit of the surface from glossy paints. Often people do this instead of sanding. If you are planning on sanding the surfaces, I don't think there is any need for the TSP.

 

Note that for kitchens, you might want to go with some of the specialty primers that provide quite a bit better adhesion to glossy/oily surfaces just in case your sanding isn't perfect. I've used Zinsser Bull's Eye many times and find it to do a great job of holding to surfaces and has the added benefit of being a terrific stain-blocker. Not cheap but I believe it is worth it. (Note that if you use the Zinsser it's best to do it on a day when you can open the windows. It is an acrylic product but it has some ammonia smell.)

Excellent, I have Zinsser!

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Question: I'm painting wooden kitchen cabinets and someone told me that I need to wash them down with a TSP based product. This junk looks awfully toxic and quite frankly I don't want to add another step, especially if it is unnecessary. I think he's thinking that I need to wash off the oily kitchen dirt to prime the surface but I took off the cabinet doors so the inside (where I'm actually painting) is not especially dirty. Can I just do as I've done previously: sand and then use a primer?

I would still scrub with something before you sand; nothing worse than sanding off dirt. I like to use those coarse green, nylon scrubbies you buy at Chinese grocery stores (well, you can buy them anywhere, but they cost less there...) I think I may have just used Murphy's oil soap or Fantastic last time, I don't remember...

TSP isn't necessary,although come to think of it, I may have used it....You are not allowed to save a step, sorry. Now that you own it, you have to do everything right... :D

Ok, I will scrub but that TSP stuff gives me the heebie jeebies.

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Question: I'm painting wooden kitchen cabinets and someone told me that I need to wash them down with a TSP based product. This junk looks awfully toxic and quite frankly I don't want to add another step, especially if it is unnecessary. I think he's thinking that I need to wash off the oily kitchen dirt to prime the surface but I took off the cabinet doors so the inside (where I'm actually painting) is not especially dirty. Can I just do as I've done previously: sand and then use a primer?

I would still scrub with something before you sand; nothing worse than sanding off dirt. I like to use those coarse green, nylon scrubbies you buy at Chinese grocery stores (well, you can buy them anywhere, but they cost less there...) I think I may have just used Murphy's oil soap or Fantastic last time, I don't remember...

TSP isn't necessary,although come to think of it, I may have used it....You are not allowed to save a step, sorry. Now that you own it, you have to do everything right... :D

Ok, I will scrub but that TSP stuff gives me the heebie jeebies.

Okay....the added benefit of scrubbing, and letting it dry thoroughly, as Omni mentioned, is that you usually have to do less sanding...Those green scrubbies actually rough up the surface a little, to start...

Now that you're a homeowner, with lots of projects, have you considered a palm sander? Or do you already have one?

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Now that you're a homeowner, with lots of projects, have you considered a palm sander? Or do you already have one?

I don't have one but now that you mention it, I SO need one. Do you have one? And if so, what kind?

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