Jump to content

Painting Wood Furniture


Recommended Posts

Question: I'm painting wooden kitchen cabinets and someone told me that I need to wash them down with a TSP based product. This junk looks awfully toxic and quite frankly I don't want to add another step, especially if it is unnecessary. I think he's thinking that I need to wash off the oily kitchen dirt to prime the surface but I took off the cabinet doors so the inside (where I'm actually painting) is not especially dirty. Can I just do as I've done previously: sand and then use a primer?

Thrift savings plan?

Travelling salesman problem?

Team software process?

Time series processor?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 94
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Question: I'm painting wooden kitchen cabinets and someone told me that I need to wash them down with a TSP based product. This junk looks awfully toxic and quite frankly I don't want to add another step, especially if it is unnecessary. I think he's thinking that I need to wash off the oily kitchen dirt to prime the surface but I took off the cabinet doors so the inside (where I'm actually painting) is not especially dirty. Can I just do as I've done previously: sand and then use a primer?

Thrift savings plan?

Travelling salesman problem?

Team software process?

Time series processor?

Trisodium phosphate....

Link to post
Share on other sites
Question: I'm painting wooden kitchen cabinets and someone told me that I need to wash them down with a TSP based product. This junk looks awfully toxic and quite frankly I don't want to add another step, especially if it is unnecessary. I think he's thinking that I need to wash off the oily kitchen dirt to prime the surface but I took off the cabinet doors so the inside (where I'm actually painting) is not especially dirty. Can I just do as I've done previously: sand and then use a primer?

Thrift savings plan?

Travelling salesman problem?

Team software process?

Time series processor?

Trisodium phosphate.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Question: I'm painting wooden kitchen cabinets and someone told me that I need to wash them down with a TSP based product. This junk looks awfully toxic and quite frankly I don't want to add another step, especially if it is unnecessary. I think he's thinking that I need to wash off the oily kitchen dirt to prime the surface but I took off the cabinet doors so the inside (where I'm actually painting) is not especially dirty. Can I just do as I've done previously: sand and then use a primer?

One of the main reasons that people use TSP is to take the oils from the surface and to even knock a bit of the surface from glossy paints. Often people do this instead of sanding. If you are planning on sanding the surfaces, I don't think there is any need for the TSP.

 

Note that for kitchens, you might want to go with some of the specialty primers that provide quite a bit better adhesion to glossy/oily surfaces just in case your sanding isn't perfect. I've used Zinsser Bull's Eye many times and find it to do a great job of holding to surfaces and has the added benefit of being a terrific stain-blocker. Not cheap but I believe it is worth it. (Note that if you use the Zinsser it's best to do it on a day when you can open the windows. It is an acrylic product but it has some ammonia smell.)

Excellent, I have Zinsser!

 

 

I think Zinsser makes at least several primers. Check to see that you have the one that makes the most sense for this purpose.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, sillies, look at the list of ingredients on your Cheerios box. They add TSP to keep them from going soggy too fast. The Wiki info is fun reading. It says to use turpentine (mineral spirits) first, then wash down with TSP, then soap and water, and let dry thoroughly. Have humidity right now? I'd wait for a less humid day. Then do a coat of primer according to base paint, water-based or oil. Oil-based will take longer to dry and will stink loudly but give better coverage. Also, it matters what look you are after. The latest thing for the country cottage look is to strip off all previous finishes and paint with milk paint. It bonds permanently with the raw wood and has a very attractive rustic appearance. I have never tried this and don't know how it holds up against war and pestilence.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey, sillies, look at the list of ingredients on your Cheerios box. They add TSP to keep them from going soggy too fast. The Wiki info is fun reading. It says to use turpentine (mineral spirits) first, then wash down with TSP, then soap and water, and let dry thoroughly. Have humidity right now? I'd wait for a less humid day. Then do a coat of primer according to base paint, water-based or oil. Oil-based will take longer to dry and will stink loudly but give better coverage. Also, it matters what look you are after. The latest thing for the country cottage look is to strip off all previous finishes and paint with milk paint. It bonds permanently with the raw wood and has a very attractive rustic appearance.

 

 

....anxiety.......

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey, sillies, look at the list of ingredients on your Cheerios box. They add TSP to keep them from going soggy too fast. The Wiki info is fun reading. It says to use turpentine (mineral spirits) first, then wash down with TSP, then soap and water, and let dry thoroughly. Have humidity right now? I'd wait for a less humid day. Then do a coat of primer according to base paint, water-based or oil. Oil-based will take longer to dry and will stink loudly but give better coverage. Also, it matters what look you are after. The latest thing for the country cottage look is to strip off all previous finishes and paint with milk paint. It bonds permanently with the raw wood and has a very attractive rustic appearance. I have never tried this and don't know how it holds up against war and pestilence.

TSP isn't as ghastly as they make you think; I just use gloves. I save the turpentine washing for really nasty, spider-webby barn finds, or varnished furniture I really don't plan on painting....Turpentine washing takes a LOOOOONG time to dry, and air out. There's no need for turpentine andTSP...

Link to post
Share on other sites
TSP isn't as ghastly as they make you think; I just use gloves. I save the turpentine washing for really nasty, spider-webby barn finds, or varnished furniture I really don't plan on painting....Turpentine washing takes a LOOOOONG time to dry, and air out. There's no need for turpentine andTSP...

 

The turpentine functions like fingernail polish remover. The TSP is a degreaser primarily. If you have a gas stove or heavy smokers' residue, either/or/both works. Some people don't bother with either and just use a primer for adhesion followed within a day or two by the color coat . I have a friend who solves all her mildew problems with turpentine. I have two friends whose houses were whooshed up in flames and destroyed by turpentine or varnish residues that got sparked. Your ultimately desired appearance will dictate method and materials. Ya want to go really classy, you will hire someone who knows how to paint, steel wool, paint, steel wool, paint, stool wool, till the wood looks and feels like glass. Ask to see samples of the worker's work and expect to pay for all the elbow work. A lot. Almost nobody does this anymore, but it is gorgeous.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Question: I'm painting wooden kitchen cabinets and someone told me that I need to wash them down with a TSP based product. This junk looks awfully toxic and quite frankly I don't want to add another step, especially if it is unnecessary. I think he's thinking that I need to wash off the oily kitchen dirt to prime the surface but I took off the cabinet doors so the inside (where I'm actually painting) is not especially dirty. Can I just do as I've done previously: sand and then use a primer?

I would still scrub with something before you sand; nothing worse than sanding off dirt. I like to use those coarse green, nylon scrubbies you buy at Chinese grocery stores (well, you can buy them anywhere, but they cost less there...) I think I may have just used Murphy's oil soap or Fantastic last time, I don't remember...

TSP isn't necessary,although come to think of it, I may have used it....You are not allowed to save a step, sorry. Now that you own it, you have to do everything right... :D

Ok, I will scrub but that TSP stuff gives me the heebie jeebies.

wear gloves, open the windows and you will probably live.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Now that you're a homeowner, with lots of projects, have you considered a palm sander? Or do you already have one?

I don't have one but now that you mention it, I SO need one. Do you have one? And if so, what kind?

i have a craftsman brand one and it's easy to use and lightweight. i think it's called the mouse. perfect for cabinets and interior doors

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...