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Rillettes - help!

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Not really. I came by about 5.5# of frozen Hudson Valley legs and thighs today. Shopping sans recipe or technique, I could not find any rendered duck fat - but I figure there's plenty to be rendered from the meat I already have. Also bought 1# lean pork tenderloin and bacon to render bacon fat, because I got inspired and decided I wanted to do duck AND pork rillettes.

 

I'm a total novice. Yes, I can use google and site search here and elsewhere, and I do have Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook, but I didn't buy pork belly. For pork rillettes, I was planning on using a recipe I found elsewhere on this site, which just called for lean pork, bacon fat and spices (I'll look up the donor later - thank you in advance, whoever you were). I have sage, I have thyme, I have juniper berries, I have peppercorns, and I bought some lard (not sure why, it just seemed like I should have it on hand - it's not leaflard). I suppose I need some white wine and some cognac?

 

Help me accomplish my duo of rillettes. Recipes and techniques greatly appreciated. No big rush - I'd like to make them next week. I do plan on having the willpower to leave the rillettes alone for one week after making them. Certainly not one year, as I have seen posted from time to time.

 

Do I really need earthenware pots to store it in? Can I get by with ceramic ramekins?

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Oh good, something I can make. It's usually the case that rillettes billed as duck or goose or rabbit have a proportion of pork mixed in, so you're on the right track. I'm surprised the recipes call for lean pork. The principle part of the cooking is easy: you are going to very gently render your meats in the oven with the chosen flavorings (if it's lean pork, you might want a bit of liquid to braise it in - if so, maybe separate from the duck). When the meats are really fork tender, leave them to cool. Then comes the fun part, which is using a fork held in each hand to shred the meat. A bit like pulled meat in the BBQ context (and yes, you can use your fingers).

 

As for storage, I should have thought any kind of sterilised pot would do. Since the plan is to make a tight seal by pouring the liquid fat (which you will have reserved) on top of the meat (very tightly packed down, no air-pockets) and letting it set, the seal on the pot is not so important.

 

Haven't made in ages - good idea (thinks *goat rillettes* :) ).

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Goat rillettes - I'd stand in line for those, as well.

 

Okay, lemme get this straight - I can do a combo of pork/duck rillettes without angering the culinary gods? That would be awesome. Does the lard I bought have a role to play here? Do I absolutely need to go out and buy pork belly in addition to my tenderloin and bacon? Whither the white wine and cognac question?

 

Hopefully between us all (and myself acting as the mad scientist), we can come up with a good recipe and technique.

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Drink the white wine and cognac if it all goes wrong. :)

 

Yes, so-called duck rillettes are normally a mix of duck and pork. You couldn't make rabbit rillettes with rabbit alone - it's too dry.

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Hell, I've stored my duck confit in Glad/Ziploc plastic containers, which I keep in the fridge. I don't see why you couldn't do the same for rillettes.

 

As with confit, it might add flavor if you marinate and/or salt the meats first. Then drain/rinse before braising etc. per Wilf. Wine and cognac might be nice for the braising; but before shredding and mixing with the fat, drain off the liquid and separate the juices from the fat. The juices can be used for all sorts of things. Yum.

 

Let's see: I will be going to Chicago next spring. If you do everything properly, and aren't too piggy, :) you might just still have some rillettes when I hit the Midwest. :)

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Half a pork shoulder -> rillettes

 

This time, I included ALL fat,

49789756236_daac83b429_c.jpg

 

After 2 hours at 250F

49790073132_085584f1f4_c.jpg

 

After 3 1/2 hours, mashed with a fork, juices and fat returned

49789755926_a764d76a8e_c.jpg

 

Two larger for the freezer.    Chuck enjoys this not only on crackers and baguette but also fried up as carnitas.   

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