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Vanessa

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The reason I asked is because I had brined that pork shoulder I made for a longer period that I usually do, and I didn't like the texture once it was roasted.

 

I think the loin is a better choice for long brining and then cooking to a lower temperature than necessary for a shoulder. And I missed the luscious quality of a non-brined pork shoulder in the dish as I made it.

 

was your brine salt or acid? 

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What are you cooking the shrimp with

An experiment with wild "red" shrimp, allegedly from Argentina (but purchased frozen at Trader Joe's!). Since this new Trader Joe's opened across the street, I am systematically trying various products, to see what I might add to my ingredients list.

 

 

 

These are exactly the same red shrimps as you get from Florida in season, except caught in colder waters. One of the importers brings them in fresh, but the IQF ones are not bad although they do contain preservatives.  

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Agreed.   Shoulder and loin, two totally different animals.   Each delicious in its own way but not interchangeable technique.   Shoulder doesn't need the textural enhancement that brining provides, and as you say, really does not benefit from it.    Loin certainly does, also noted, to a point.

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The reason I asked is because I had brined that pork shoulder I made for a longer period that I usually do, and I didn't like the texture once it was roasted.

 

I think the loin is a better choice for long brining and then cooking to a lower temperature than necessary for a shoulder. And I missed the luscious quality of a non-brined pork shoulder in the dish as I made it.

 

was your brine salt or acid? 

 

Oh, it was a  salt brine.  I think acid brine is called marinade?

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Salad of leftovers...bib lettuce, sliced coteghino, sauted potato, tomato, h b egg, red pepper, splash of momofuku ranch

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optional pawful of Mokonut rye-cranberry-chocolate chunk-poppy seed-maldon salted cookies

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First attempt at a butterflied pork loin -> mock porchetta.    Starting at the top/fatty edge, sliced through to within a third inch of the opposite edge, reverse, do again, until you have a flat piece of meat.  Stomp down any thick ridges.

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Spread with a garlic/herb/evoo combination of your choice

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Roll tightly and tie, keeping the fat layer outside.   Start in the middle first and work to the ends.

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Lay on bed of onion or shallot

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Surround with potato or aromatics.

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Roast as size suggests.    Let rest and slice thinly.    

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Serve with pan juices.    Cold, thinly sliced leftovers may even be better.

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What's impressive, Lippy, is the lack of effort for the result.    Maybe 5 cuts, whir the herb stuff in a blender, spread it on, tie it up and it's done.    Took maybe 10 minutes at most.    My kind of cooking!

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A white bean and cabbage soup from the WWOZ 30th Anniversary cookbook.  We used RG Alubia Blancas, but it was somewhat bland, and much lighter in color than the picture with the recipe.  It called for "Cajun seasoning" with no explanation anywhere in the book; I guess if you're from New Orleans, you don't need one.  We have tons of leftovers, so we're going to jazz the remainder up with smoked andouille.

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Cranberry beans, ground pork, poblano and green chilis, half a can green enchilada sauce, of course onions and garlic.    

 

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What's impressive, Lippy, is the lack of effort for the result.    Maybe 5 cuts, whir the herb stuff in a blender, spread it on, tie it up and it's done.    Took maybe 10 minutes at most.    My kind of cooking!

Looks good. There is a recipe for Mock Porchetta in the Zuni Cafe cookbook that is also very easy. You start with a pork shoulder and cut the "veins" of fat and stuff those with herb/lemon mixture and tie it into a roast shape, surround with vegetables and put it into a cast iron skillet for roasting. I tend to go overboard with fennel because we love it.

 

I can't vouch for this website but it has the recipe from the cookbook: https://shadowcook.com/2008/02/03/judy-rodgers-mock-porchetta/

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Mississippi Roast with pasta and scorched beet greens.

 

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I faulted the beef but husband said he had no complaints.

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That's funny. in my mind's eye, yours looks orders of magnitude better! I marvel at what you churn out night after (late) night.

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