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How was the Panang Curry the other day Miss J.  I just wrote up that recipe and would be nice to know how it turned out for others so I could fix it if needed.

Generally, very good. Everyone really enjoyed it, and I think I hit the correct sweet/rich notes. One thing I did notice on the night I prepared it was that I was aware of the shrimp paste in the finished curry, although I don't think anyone else was. And the next day, when I reheated the leftovers, I noticed that the shrimp paste had become considerably more assertive overnight. (Again, I was the only person who seemed to notice.) I wasn't sure if this was because I hadn't roasted it long enough before adding it to the curry paste, or if there was just a bit too much of it. I'm going to continue experimenting with penang paste this week.

 

Tonight: fish-fragrant bean curd, steamed rice, stir-fried courgettes with garlic

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Working my way through some Indian recipes from a not very good book - an experiment in seeing what works and what doesn't. The night before last I turned my kitchen into a post-hurricane site with a

Ta. I must give this a try.

Thank you thank you. But doesn't everyone look better wearing a bath mat?

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I thought so. Both birds were juicy (one roasted, one pot-roasted), and both were well-flavoured; the dark meat was less "gamey" than "intense chicken", if you know what I mean. And they're excellent for feeding two people whilst allowing for generous leftovers. The chickens, OTOH, are considerably bigger than what you'd expect - they feed four with enough for sandwiches the next day.

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a few things I've cooked recently:

 

Ricotta Gnocci from Zuni Cafe: Ricotta, parmesan, lemon zest, sage, egg whipped up, moulded, dusted with flour and cooked. served with butter and more sage.

 

Breast of lamb Ste. Menehould from Meat. will post on relevant thread.

 

Tonight's supper is a soup I made last night with borlotti beans, lots of veg and the end of a proscuitto ham.

 

I even found the time to make my own crisps!

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Roasted tomato bisque with parmesan tuiles on the side.

 

Then in a single course:

 

Baked potatoes (very crisp jackets), scooped and mixed with salt cod into a brandade, then stuffed with a soft poached quail egg and chives.

 

Polpotonne (Italian meatloaf) of pork and lamb with chiles, cumin seed, oregano, garlic, duxelle, sauteed onion and celery, eggs, panko, topped with panko and grated parm reg.

 

Very green beans with Mediterranean yogurt and salmon roe.

 

Then:

Cheese course with in-house petit pain. (Mostly varities of chevre with absurd names like Peter, Madelaine etc from a single guy operation in Quebec.)

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How was the Panang Curry the other day Miss J.  I just wrote up that recipe and would be nice to know how it turned out for others so I could fix it if needed.

Generally, very good. Everyone really enjoyed it, and I think I hit the correct sweet/rich notes. One thing I did notice on the night I prepared it was that I was aware of the shrimp paste in the finished curry, although I don't think anyone else was. And the next day, when I reheated the leftovers, I noticed that the shrimp paste had become considerably more assertive overnight. (Again, I was the only person who seemed to notice.) I wasn't sure if this was because I hadn't roasted it long enough before adding it to the curry paste, or if there was just a bit too much of it. I'm going to continue experimenting with penang paste this week.

 

Tonight: fish-fragrant bean curd, steamed rice, stir-fried courgettes with garlic

Different brand of shrimp paste will have different intensity, so yes, you should be careful. Which one did you use by the way? Was it Thai, Malysian, Indonesian, or Philippino? They are very different, and if you are cooking Thai food I would stick with a Thai brand, actually.

 

How strong your fish sauce was may have also played a part in it. I regularly use salt in dishes that I feel have enough fishy taste in them, or sometimes I would use a combination of salt and fish sauce --first use fish sauce until I feel the flavor has been built up enough, then I would add salt if it needed to be more salty. Even the same brand of fish sauce from 2 different batches will have different intensity levels.

 

This is why it's so hard to have exact recipe for Thai food...

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You know, that's a VERY good question. I bought this particular packet of shrimp paste quite recently from a "gourmet" shop rather than a dedicated Asian one, and I didn't look terribly closely at the label. I'll do that tonight, as well as check the fish sauce. :D

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Ricotta Gnocci from Zuni Cafe: Ricotta, parmesan, lemon zest, sage, egg whipped up, moulded, dusted with flour and cooked. served with butter and more sage.

 

Tell me more, ampleT. After the dismal failure of my last attempt at spinach ricotta gnocchi, I've been wondering about the Zuni ones. Did they take ages? Were they wonderful?

 

clb

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Seared salmon with roasted radicchio, pancetta, toasted pine nuts, and balsamic vinegar. W/fresh marjoram and some olive oil. A Jamie Oliver recipe, and a definite keeper - 20 minutes start to finish, beautiful, and delicious. Really delicious.

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Ricotta Gnocci from Zuni Cafe: Ricotta, parmesan, lemon zest, sage, egg whipped up, moulded, dusted with flour and cooked. served with butter and more sage.

 

Tell me more, ampleT. After the dismal failure of my last attempt at spinach ricotta gnocchi, I've been wondering about the Zuni ones. Did they take ages? Were they wonderful?

 

clb

they were very good and v.quick to make. just whip up the mixture, I then used two teaspoons to shape them, dusted with flour and put in fridge for an hour to make them easier to handle. Cooked for about 3 mins served with a little melted butter poured over. Delicate yet comforting and tasty at the same time.

Rodgers writes about a page on the quality of your ricotta that I completely agree with (mine was Savoria) and then on the wettness of the cheese, squeezing it out in muslin, leaving it overnight etc but I didn't bother with any of that.

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Haven't cooked much as I have had the flu for the holiday period. Did buy a big fuck-off turkey the day after Christmas for £3 (reduced from £20) as part of a "What does everybody else has for Christmas" experience. Cooked this for ~4 hours both breast and legs were tender and juicy etc. But there is very little flavour in these things? Thankfully, I cooked mlinci which soaked up the majority of the flavour. Ate all the mlinci, and ate turkey sandwiches for two days, then tossed the beast. Disgusting really, what a waste of resources. Interesting experiement though.

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Ricotta Gnocci from Zuni Cafe: Ricotta, parmesan, lemon zest, sage, egg whipped up, moulded, dusted with flour and cooked. served with butter and more sage.

 

Tell me more, ampleT. After the dismal failure of my last attempt at spinach ricotta gnocchi, I've been wondering about the Zuni ones. Did they take ages? Were they wonderful?

 

clb

they were very good and v.quick to make. just whip up the mixture, I then used two teaspoons to shape them, dusted with flour and put in fridge for an hour to make them easier to handle. Cooked for about 3 mins served with a little melted butter poured over. Delicate yet comforting and tasty at the same time.

Rodgers writes about a page on the quality of your ricotta that I completely agree with (mine was Savoria) and then on the wettness of the cheese, squeezing it out in muslin, leaving it overnight etc but I didn't bother with any of that.

Yes, I think it was all that stuff about getting the moisture content of the ricotta right that put me off. Glad to know one doesn't really need to get too worried about it. I'll try La Fromagerie.

 

Thanks, ample.

 

C

 

Edited to remove misleading allegation that Savoria had failed to supply ricotta with my last order when it was actually mozzarella they didn't deliver (and I ate the ricotta all up by myself instead of cooking with it :D).

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clb, I too find it difficult to do anything but ricotta but eat it. Preferably straight out of the container. With a spoon. :D

 

Last night I poached a chicken breast in gingered guinea fowl stock, fished it out, sliced it on the diagonal, then ate it and the stock over fine Chinese egg noodles with a plate of steamed veg.

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Guest johnboy
Haven't cooked much as I have had the flu for the holiday period. Did buy a big fuck-off turkey the day after Christmas for £3 (reduced from £20) as part of a "What does everybody else has for Christmas" experience. Cooked this for ~4 hours both breast and legs were tender and juicy etc. But there is very little flavour in these things? Thankfully, I cooked mlinci which soaked up the majority of the flavour. Ate all the mlinci, and ate turkey sandwiches for two days, then tossed the beast. Disgusting really, what a waste of resources. Interesting experiement though.

Adam,

 

we brined the turkey this year. Yes, yes, I realise brining gets a mixed opinion on this site, but I thought it turned out rather well. It was one of those Kelly Bronze turkeys, brined for ~50hrs (put it in Christmas eve, had it boxing day, Christmas day was glazed ham - very good!). Stuffed the neck end of the turkey with a sausage-meat and sage stuffing (a la Gary Rhodes) and the cavity with a bread and celery stuffing (a la my mum). The turkey was very moist, and between 8 of us there wasn't too much leftovers - thank god, though enough for turkey a la king one day and ham and pea soup another , plus a couple of sandwiches of course.

 

I like brining.

 

P.S. We went out on Christmas eve and picked up two whole turkeys for a fiver each, reduced from about £30 each! They are now sitting in the permafrost at the bottom of my freezer taking up a huge amount of space.

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