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Getting into salad weather here. Nicoise last night, following couscous with roasted pepper salad the night before, and an old-school greek salad the night before that. Some of these (not the nicoise) were augmented with doggy-bag steak from a meat-feast at a new Peruvian restaurant round the corner.

 

Mango season is starting, strawberries taste unusually good and pineapples are dirt cheap so it's fruit salad for pud. It's almost enough to make up for not being in the same hemisphere as my parent's blueberry bushes.

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Working my way through some Indian recipes from a not very good book - an experiment in seeing what works and what doesn't. The night before last I turned my kitchen into a post-hurricane site with a

Ta. I must give this a try.

Thank you thank you. But doesn't everyone look better wearing a bath mat?

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Not exactly salad weather, here in the Big Apple. Thick Dines Farm pork chops last night, marinaded in olive oil, vinegar and thyme as usual. Some nice vegetables from the Tompikins Square green market too: a crinkly white cabbage, cooked in chicken stock; "organic" (as opposed to synthetic) broccoli; and these long, thin, gnarly orange vegetables, which looked like freshly dug carrots with two sharp ends, and turned out to be some kind of sweet potato or yam - mashed with butter.

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Guest Suzanne F

All you anti-fusion people, skip this one:

 

A version of Ethiopian kale and potatoes -- but I added a bit too much mit-mit. :wub: The accompanying cottage cheese and our usual big mixed green salad helped, but we still couldn't finish it. Since I have no teff to make injera, substituted large flour tortillas.

 

 

Tonight: beef empanadas (cheating with bought pastry), avocado, pickled onions, salsas, ubiquitous salad.

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Julia Child's chicken breasts with paprika (a delicious sauce with onions (blanched), cream, vermouth, stock) accompanied by risotto. I was very pleased with the result.

 

On Saturday night, beef carbonade (basically chuck stew with prunes and beer) from David Rosengarten's Dean & Deluca cook book. Served with bowtie pasta. I was very pleased with that too. And I think my gouty invalid like the meals too.

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amontillado braised pork baby ribs with rosemary and chanterelles (from Moro): there was some space left in cazuela so i threw couple of whole butifarra sausages in and braised everything in a very slow oven for couple of hours. Pan roasted mushrooms were added to casuela in the last 10mins also slicing sausages at the same time for the final flavor blending.

The ribs and sausages were meltingly tender but mushrooms although very good by themselves seemed sort of superflous adding nothing to the dish.

The braised ruby chard on the other hand was a perfect match: used Wolfert's technique - instead of blanching the swiss chard in boling water, she suggests to rub salt into the leaves and then wilt them in a warm skillet, thus retaining all the vibrant color and flavor: indeed.

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NY strip steak, beautifully cooked by Nobleboyfriend; macaroni & cheese made with some of the Goudas that we brought back from Amsterdam; kale cooked into submission with a bit of salt pork. I think I should have used something smokier. Too full for the baked apples.

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Julia Child's chicken breasts with paprika (a delicious sauce with onions (blanched), cream, vermouth, stock) accompanied by risotto. I was very pleased with the result.

 

On Saturday night, beef carbonade (basically chuck stew with prunes and beer) from David Rosengarten's Dean & Deluca cook book. Served with bowtie pasta. I was very pleased with that too. And I think my gouty invalid like the meals too.

I'm planning on making beef carbonnade on Friday night. No prunes in mine though. But now I am reminded of a braised pork dish using Chimay as the liquid and including prunes. I'm torn.

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The braised ruby chard on the other hand was a perfect match: used Wolfert's technique - instead of blanching the swiss chard in boling water, she suggests to rub salt into the leaves and then wilt them in a warm skillet, thus retaining all the vibrant color and flavor: indeed.

And that's it? No liquid?

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nope: you chop chard leaves finely, dump into colander, rub the salt (1tbs for 2lb) leave it for a min, and then rinse and squeeze dry. And then cook for about 8-10 mins until ready.

i cooked this with one of those red hot long peppers nobody wants to tell me about, thinly sliced.

Paula uses them in salad with yogurt/tahini/cumin dressing - very good, i made it before.

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I only blanch chard if I am using the blanching liquid in a soup. I've been using that salt technique for years but I don't think I got it from Wolfert but rather Hazan. some chard gives up a good deal of liquid when braised, I find.

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