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I also love the Zuni method when I remember to buy my chicken ahead of time. I'm convinced that the pre-salting/seasoning thing is a great treatment for poultry and for meats as well. Beautiful bird, mongo.

 

My current favorite way of roasting chicken is to pre-season a la Zuni as well as spatchcocking (butterflying) the bird by cutting out the backbone and flattening it on a half-sheet cake pan. Carving is very easy, especially if you use poultry shears and the skin stays crisp.

 

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Yes to thighs in the toaster oven; especially the Cuisinart Steam... My experiments so far have proven quite positive. From delicious, juicy pork chops to chicken thighs (Empire kosher, fwi

Reminds me of the first time I had "free-range" chicken, I think at Demarchelier: the flavor was so strong, I thought it had gone off.

Yeah, but you and the other chicken people obvs like tasteless salmonella birds.

My current favorite way of roasting chicken is to pre-season a la Zuni as well as spatchcocking (butterflying) the bird by cutting out the backbone and flattening it on a half-sheet cake pan. Carving is very easy, especially if you use poultry shears and the skin stays crisp.
This sounds perfect, Lippy.

 

As an aside, has anyone tried the slashed roasted chicken method? More than a few food bloggers I respect swear by it. I haven't tried it yet. Maybe this week.

 

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My current favorite way of roasting chicken is to pre-season a la Zuni as well as spatchcocking (butterflying) the bird by cutting out the backbone and flattening it on a half-sheet cake pan. Carving is very easy, especially if you use poultry shears and the skin stays crisp.
This sounds perfect, Lippy.

 

As an aside, has anyone tried the slashed roasted chicken method? More than a few food bloggers I respect swear by it. I haven't tried it yet. Maybe this week.

OK, I must make a roast chicken very soon.

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I made a 5.5-pound roasted chicken last night. In the cavity: one Meyer lemon (pierced several times) and a spring of rosemary. On the skin: black truffle oil, some melted butter, Halen Mon smoked Welsh sea salt, ground pepper, and dried tarragon.

 

Cooked in convection/toaster oven (thanks, Squeat!) at 400F for fifteen minutes, then foil on the breast and finished at 350F until done. Served with a sauté of the last of the summer vegetables from Love Apple Farm—the farmer herself cooked them, using Persian lime oil, some courgettes, yellow and black/red heirloom tomatoes, and basil. We also had a risotto, which was probably overkill, but I had a lot of hungry people to feed. (Slapsie: you'll be happy to know that this was all proceeded by your inspirational dry Fino sherry combo: boquerones, Marcona almonds with saffron honey, and padrón peppers, along with a baguette with some fine olive oil and balsamic.)

 

I wouldn't mind trying that slashed chicken, if only it had photos of the procedure. Which way do the slashes go? Longways, I guess?

 

And I think I need to cave in and get the Zuni cookbook.

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  • 6 months later...

after a number of years doing the zuni chicken method, i returned tonight to marcella hazan's still life with two lemons. for a 3.5lb bird i think this may be the better method. wonderfully juicy meat all through and a lovely, clear flavour. the skin is not as crispy as with the zuni blast furnace method, but it makes for more consistently moist flesh. i do have a couple of two pounders in the freezer, and i think those might get the zuni treatment in the next couple of weeks.

 

for those without the book: all you do is salt and pepper the bird generously, shove 2 small lemons (or in my case tonight, one large one) that you've pierced all over into the cavity, and then close the cavity loosely with some toothpicks. 350 degree oven, breast down for 30 minutes, another 30 breast up, and then at 400 for the last 20 minutes.

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My current favorite way of roasting chicken is to pre-season a la Zuni as well as spatchcocking (butterflying) the bird by cutting out the backbone and flattening it on a half-sheet cake pan. Carving is very easy, especially if you use poultry shears and the skin stays crisp.
This sounds perfect, Lippy.

 

As an aside, has anyone tried the slashed roasted chicken method? More than a few food bloggers I respect swear by it. I haven't tried it yet. Maybe this week.

 

 

I separate the skin from the breast then slash and stuff with butter, herbs and spices. I like to keep the skin intact for appearance and because exposed bits of flesh will dry out during cooking.

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I'm sure I've posted this elsewhere, but my take for the past couple years has basically been the Zuni method with the additional step of icing down the breast while the rest of the bird comes up to room temperature. About 30 minutes on the counter, ice pack on breast, while the rest of the bird warms up. Into a relatively hot pan. The temperature differential results in white and dark meat that finishes at the same time.

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I'm sure I've posted this elsewhere, but my take for the past couple years has basically been the Zuni method with the additional step of icing down the breast while the rest of the bird comes up to room temperature. About 30 minutes on the counter, ice pack on breast, while the rest of the bird warms up. Into a relatively hot pan. The temperature differential results in white and dark meat that finishes at the same time.

Neat idea.

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for those without the book: all you do is salt and pepper the bird generously, shove 2 small lemons (or in my case tonight, one large one) that you've pierced all over into the cavity, and then close the cavity loosely with some toothpicks. 350 degree oven, breast down for 30 minutes, another 30 breast up, and then at 400 for the last 20 minutes.

 

If I have an hour and a half I do it this way. If I have less than an hour I spatchcock the chicken, coat it with a mix of olive oil, garlic & herbs de provence, and cook it "under a brick."

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  • 8 years later...

I find roast chicken an enigma. Common sense dictates that you start with a premium bird. But today I started with a supermarket bird and was under the gun with prep as we injudiciously iinvited country neighbors for dinner at short notice.. I tossed together a (canned) cherry claufouti at the last minute, which stole oven time from the chicken. Claufouti finally out, I followed Judy Rogers' blast roasting technique.

 

Chicken, out of the oven in an hour and well rested was superb. Deep brown uniform color, juicy breast and darks. Excellent gravy.

 

I wish I could take credit, but it must go to JR. Cheap bird, rushed attention and I've never cooked a better bird. Thanks, Judy. What can I say....

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I find roast chicken an enigma. Common sense dictates that you start with a premium bird. But today I started with a supermarket bird and was under the gun with prep as we injudiciously invited country neighbors for dinner at short notice.. I tossed together a (canned) cherry claufouti at the last minute, which stole oven time from the chicken. Claufouti finally out, I followed Judy Rogers' blast roasting technique.

 

Chicken, out of the oven in an hour then well rested was superb. Deep brown uniform color, juicy breast and darks. Excellent gravy.

 

I wish I could take credit, but it must go to JR. Cheap bird, rushed attention and I've never cooked a better bird. Thanks, Judy. What can I say....

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High (brief) heat is the answer, I find, to many things chicken (and small turkey).

(As well as rubbing in a lot of salt, pepper, other herbs/spices, elevated

with generous amounts of butter or other fat, both under the skin and on it.)

 

More times than I like, I arrive in Manhattan at 11 p.m., with an 8-to-8 day

to follow, with no edible food within reach. I grab 4 thighs (chicken, people),

pre-heat the toaster oven to 480 as I walk in the door, rub my thighs with salt,

black pepper, and cayenne, then stick them in the oven. Less than a half hour

later -- I'm in my lungi by then, and my bag packed for what-passes-for-work

the next day -- the chicken is done, the skin almost gribenish.

 

Two for that night, two for tomorrow.

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High (brief) heat is the answer, I find, to many things chicken (and small turkey).

(As well as rubbing in a lot of salt, pepper, other herbs/spices, elevated

with generous amounts of butter or other fat, both under the skin and on it.)

 

More times than I like, I arrive in Manhattan at 11 p.m., with an 8-to-8 day

to follow, with no edible food within reach. I grab 4 thighs (chicken, people),

pre-heat the toaster oven to 480 as I walk in the door, rub my thighs with salt,

black pepper, and cayenne, then stick them in the oven. Less than a half hour

later -- I'm in my lungi by then, and my bag packed for what-passes-for-work

the next day -- the chicken is done, the skin almost gribenish.

 

Two for that night, two for tomorrow.

 

Yes to thighs in the toaster oven; especially the Cuisinart Steam...

12085012564_893ce45e01.jpg
My experiments so far have proven quite positive. From delicious, juicy pork chops to chicken thighs (Empire kosher, fwiw) with some of the crispest skin imaginable (which is kind of interesting, considering the steam makes one think crisp isn't gonna happen)...
12085005034_b0cd186401.jpg
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