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Among the notable:   Asian Sauces and Marinades - nice book with a quite a few of interesting ideas.   Asian Cook by Terry Tan - his Shiok! on Singaporean food is pretty good, but this one is mus

I decided my cocktail library needed some growth. Cocktail Codex and Dale DeGroff's New Craft of the Cocktail arrived yesterday.

Adam, have you made anything from Classic French Cooking yet? It just arrived today -- so cozy, with two ribbon bookmarks for ease of moving between two recipes. My impression is that it's a later generation's Mastering the Art of French Cooking. If I have a complaint, it's that it doesn't lie flat on the counter, but that has nothing to do with the quality of the recipes. I can always use my cookbook holder.

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A very fruitful visit to an Oxfam bookshop - in fact if any UK Mouth finds themselves near Henley they are strongly recommended to visit the shop to buy from the excellent, cheap cookbook section.

 

The Four Seasons by Tom Margittai and Paul Kovi - which I discover on getting home is quite different from the Four Seasons Cookbook by Charlotte Adams published nearly 10 years earlier. This is a book after Wilf's heart.

 

A wonderful Swedish book (in English) called Crayfish Rhapsody: A culinary and historical voyage to the world of crayfish. Everything you might want on this creature, in a fun, informative, well-illustrated format.

 

An early book by Anne Willan that I had never seen before: Entertaining: Complete menus for all occasions.

 

Finally, Dale de Groff's Craft of the Cocktail which I already have, but as it is not widely distributed in this country and was going for £4.99, I couldn't resist. So the first person to contact me is welcome to it.

 

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"The New Complete Book of Mexican Cooking

 

by Elisabeth Lambert Ortiz"

 

"McGee on Food and Cooking: An Encyclopedia of Kitchen Science, History and Culture

by Harold McGee"

 

Also a Japanese cookbook fron grub street publishing.

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Adam, have you made anything from Classic French Cooking yet? It just arrived today -- so cozy, with two ribbon bookmarks for ease of moving between two recipes. My impression is that it's a later generation's Mastering the Art of French Cooking. If I have a complaint, it's that it doesn't lie flat on the counter, but that has nothing to do with the quality of the recipes. I can always use my cookbook holder.

Lippy - sorry I missed this. I haven't cooked from the book yet, but I haven't been doing much cooking at all recently. I have really enjoyed reading through this book. I really like E.L. so that wasn't ever going to be an issue, but I also approve of the selection of the recipes. Initially, the book didn't open out well, but I seem to have solved that by reading through it a couple of times.

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I got a new Japanese cookbook too, Cook Japanese by Masaru Doi (whose Japanese One-Pot Cookery I already had -- I think there may be one more for me to find, now I've got the two). Beautiful package -- slipcased, shiny card-stock photo pages, high-quality recipes. Passed along to me by a friend of my Mothers's who lived in Japan for a couple of years when her children were small. She also sent along an Australian cookbook, of all things, which I haven't examined closely yet, but which looks like a community compilation affair.

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Saw a new cookbook while at L'Os a Moelle having dinner a few nights ago, Restez à Table avec Vos Amis, by the usual gang of four, Camdeborde, Faucher, Breton, and Paquin.

 

The theme here is the same as the previous book by the same set of friends (who worked together under Christian Constant eons ago), Qu'est qu'on mange ce soir, that is to say a menu which could be prep ahead of time. This book focuses on food that could be served at parties without requiring severe labor in the kitchen, hence the "restez à table avec vos amis" bit, see?

 

Looked intriguing, unfortunately they didn't have a copy at the restaurant, and I didn't manage to drop by a FNAC to pick one up. Will manage to do that on my next jaunt to Paris, I'm sure.

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Amazon.co.uk package arrived yesterday with Swallowing Clouds and Nobu Now.

 

Nobu Now looks pretty interesting although there is some re hashing of stuff from the first Nobu book. I think I'll be cooking a lot from there in 2005. And Swallowing Clouds is hard to put down.

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Got Diana Kennedy's From My Mexican Kitchen yesterday, paying full whack from these people who were so nice I didn't begrudge the cost - and they threw in a jar of cayenne pepper with it.

 

A very different book from her previous - wonderful reference value - a summary of Mexican cooking techniques and ingredients rather than a cookbook with great photos. Most interesting to find out that culantro (much used in Puerto Rico as well if I remember right) is the same as Vietnamese mint.

 

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I really liked A-Z in NYC and was sad to hear it closed. And then in a tiny discount bookshop in London I saw her book for the first time.

 

Interesting recipes, although I made the cumin and black peppercorn crusted leg of lamb yesterday and was unhappy that its impossible to make good gravy out of this because the heavy spicing messes it up. In fact, I wouldn't recommend making that particular recipe if you get an excellent leg of lamb because, why? It really didn't add anything to the already gorgeous meat.

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I really liked A-Z in NYC and was sad to hear it closed. And then in a tiny discount bookshop in London I saw her book for the first time.

 

Interesting recipes, although I made the cumin and black peppercorn crusted leg of lamb yesterday and was unhappy that its impossible to make good gravy out of this because the heavy spicing messes it up. In fact, I wouldn't recommend making that particular recipe if you get an excellent leg of lamb because, why? It really didn't add anything to the already gorgeous meat.

Akiko, whose book?

 

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