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Here's the granite metate y mano I bought from a local sculptor at a Denver farmer's market, and schlepped back in my (checked) luggage. Isn't it beautiful? :huh:

 

218809127_76e2cb3eda.jpg

 

The grinding surface is rough but doesn't appear to be gritty; I scrubbed it with an old toothbrush and some mild dish soap, and the suds stayed white. Should I season it before use? How?

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Here's the granite metate y mano I bought from a local sculptor at a Denver farmer's market, and schlepped back in my (checked) luggage. Isn't it beautiful? :huh:

 

218809127_76e2cb3eda.jpg

 

The grinding surface is rough but doesn't appear to be gritty; I scrubbed it with an old toothbrush and some mild dish soap, and the suds stayed white. Should I season it before use? How?

 

Yowza! That is art. And worth the schlep.

 

I wouldn't put soap on it again. Get some white rice and grind away until the rice is pretty clean. It would be good to get one of those little hand brooms that you see but never know what to do with (escobita? Something like that) and brush away the loose rice between grindings.

 

Found it. Escobeta.

 

escabeta.jpg

 

It's a friggin beauty! (the stone, not the hand broom.)

 

Is it a metate or a molcajete? It looks somewhere in the middle.

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Cathy, given that your metate is made of granite and not volcanic stone, it will be easier and faster for you to season it. I suspect that one grinding of raw white rice will do it. Granite is harder and smoother than volcanic rock, which is the material used for most molcajetes and metates. Is the mano also granite? It looks to be.

 

It's really quite lovely. Felicidades, chica, y mucha suerte.

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Here's the granite metate y mano I bought from a local sculptor at a Denver farmer's market, and schlepped back in my (checked) luggage. Isn't it beautiful? :huh:

 

218809127_76e2cb3eda.jpg

 

The grinding surface is rough but doesn't appear to be gritty; I scrubbed it with an old toothbrush and some mild dish soap, and the suds stayed white. Should I season it before use? How?

 

irs fascinating how much of the indian kitchen i keep seeing in the mexican kitchen..

 

our stone hand grinder/crusher is called ammikallu/attukallu..kallu means stone.

 

ammikallu is a flat surface with a smooth pestle...you slide it up and down. attukallu is more like the mortar and pestle one finds in modern kitchens..only it is made of stone and one usually grinds rice/dhals(while attukallu crushes spices...mostly coconut/red chillies/cumin etc to make spice pastes) etc to a smooth batter consistency...it has a 'well' in the middle and a pestle that fits it precisely.

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Thanks, Cristina! Yes, the mano is granite too; it fits both my hand and the metate really well. Liza, I was thinking the escobeta would be good for combing out Mackie knots.

 

FB, that's so interesting. Thai mortars are also granite, right?

 

I'm so happy I decided to schlep. Rocks have always held special meaning for, and it was such a pleasure to buy this from someone who feels the same.

 

The cats can't figure out what the hell it is. :huh:

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Here's the granite metate y mano I bought from a local sculptor at a Denver farmer's market, and schlepped back in my (checked) luggage. Isn't it beautiful? :huh:

irs fascinating how much of the indian kitchen i keep seeing in the mexican kitchen..

 

our stone hand grinder/crusher is called ammikallu/attukallu..kallu means stone.

 

ammikallu is a flat surface with a smooth pestle...you slide it up and down. attukallu is more like the mortar and pestle one finds in modern kitchens..only it is made of stone and one usually grinds rice/dhals(while attukallu crushes spices...mostly coconut/red chillies/cumin etc to make spice pastes) etc to a smooth batter consistency...it has a 'well' in the middle and a pestle that fits it precisely.

Beautiful.

Note that the sculptor, Frank Guerrero, is not working from the Mexican tradition, rather from a native american/southwestern tradition.

I, Frank Guerrero have been in the rockart business since 1989, creating timeless master pieces signed and dated. I am a self taught artist and a Colorado native of the Native American and Spanish decent.

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Thanks, fml, I should have mentioned that. Frank did, on the explanatory card I managed to lose.

 

The two traditions aren't so far apart, no?

They're closer than many think; they're on a continuum. There have always been trade paths running north and south. Our "local" area has always been larger than 100 miles. And it continues today. Federal Blvd. in Denver is as much a chile roasting hot spot as any in New Mexico. This weekend I'm gorging on west slope peaches and watermelon, and Brighton corn and green beans. The ultimate in Colorado home grown.

 

Edit to add: Many people are not aware that Colorado has a large, many generations old community of mixed Spanish/Native heritage that did not filter here through Mexico.

 

Another edit: The San Luis Valley economy is centered on potatoes and onions, to get back to the hot potato discussion upthread. Our Senator Salazar hails from there.

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Toasted cumin seeds, maybe...I'm craving a wilted cabbage salad with lime-cumin vinaigrette.

 

Of course I just have a plain old lava thing, but grinding fresh chiles and salt is a great way to start a salsa. I find most people can take more intense heat than they think if there are no chile chunks. The paste makes it easy for them.

 

Edited to say NO chile chunks.

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Toasted cumin seeds, maybe...I'm craving a wilted cabbage salad with lime-cumin vinaigrette.
Of course I just have a plain old lava thing, but grinding fresh chiles and salt is a great way top start a salsa. I find most people can take more intense heat than they think if there are chile chunks. The paste makes it easy for them.

 

Humble. And, as always, all about others.

 

Rancho, you're a prince.

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