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Wilfrid1

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I'm currently reading Middlesex, has anyone else read it? I remember it being discussed elsewhere and people were criticizing the fact that it won the pulitzer prize. Maybe not Pulitzer Prize worthy (I don't really know, I never pay attention to these things and don't know what other books the prize puts this into the same league as) but its definitely a good book. It gives very good historical context for the family and the world that they are living in (all three generations of) and its making me do a lot of thinking. About Gender Identity and what it really means to be a man or a woman and if at the end of the day there is any difference or if culturally we just force the differences.

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Just finished The Secret Life of Bees and have started Lovely Bones.

 

For those of you who have read both, you're now thinking about the very strange theme I have going on.

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Just finished The Secret Life of Bees and have started Lovely Bones.

 

For those of you who have read both, you're now thinking about the very strange theme I have going on.

Lovely Bones is a good but very very sad book. I read her memoir "Lucky" after I read Lovely Bones.

 

Middlesex is a good book for all the reason mentioned above, but I don't think it was worthy of the Pulitzer.

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Just finished The Secret Life of Bees

what did you think of it?

 

i am reading Jack London's Call of the Wild with the eighth graders i've been subbing for. what a great book! today, dave died, and I felt my heart breaking four straight periods in a row. even sadder is the kids' utter disinterest...."why do we have to read this? waaaahhh....." :ph43r:

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I'm currently reading Middlesex, has anyone else read it? ......  It gives very good historical context for the family and the world that they are living in (all three generations of) and its making me do a lot of thinking.  About Gender Identity and what it really means to be a man or a woman and if at the end of the day there is any difference or if culturally we just force the differences.

Wait'll you reach the last part....After all the lovely historic background, and building his hero/ine's influences, to take us through how the characrter made the choices s/he made(don't wannah give anything away, here...), I felt he abandoned all responsibility at the end, and didn't deal with any part of the character's life , and how s/he dealt with it...Kinda like, "Okey-doke, here we are, advancing to the present with no muss, no fuss" not bloody likely!

 

OTOH, it should be getting way more praise for its insight into the Greek family after the Turkish genocide, and how that influenced the American generations of the family..

 

I liked it enough that I read "The Virgin Suicides" afterwards, which left me pretty much untouched...He never seemed to build any empathy for his characters in his readers.

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I've started re-reading Constantine's Sword, an amazing book about the history of the Church and the Jews. That got me reading the New Testament, to see what all the hubub was about. (has anyone considered the fact that Mark, et al., knew what the prophesies were and just made the stuff up? I mean, George Washington didn't really chop down the cherry tree.)

 

I'm also just beginning Desirable Daughters, 'cause I love South Asian authorss.

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I've started re-reading Constantine's Sword, an amazing book about the history of the Church and the Jews. That got me reading the New Testament, to see what all the hubub was about. (has anyone considered the fact that Mark, et al., knew what the prophesies were and just made the stuff up? ....

Constantine's Sword is an incredible book, densely footnoted, it changed my viewpoint of Christianity considerably. I don't agree with all of Conway's conclusions, but he's not afraid to sketch controversial positions with his research.

 

Elaine Pagels did a book about the gnostic Gospel of Thomas and other Patriarch suppressed books. I found that to be a useful supplement to Constantine

 

(This has the potential to be a non-MF topic, I think we got a few hundred posts on it over at OA. Usual drill. )

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Alain-Fournier, Le Grand Meaulnes. Just finished it, and have no idea why it's regarded as a classic.

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Just finished Adam Gopnik's "From Paris to the Moon" after having set it aside for several months. At first, I was very disappointed in the book, but then after revisiting it, I realized that I had gone in with the wrong set of expectations. He turns a phrase about as well as any writer around today. Several times I took note of some sentence constructions that were particularly stylish and pointedly metaphorical. Its a very tender and warm story, and in many ways a love letter to his family. While it certainly lives up to the billing as an examination of the differences bewteen an American city (New York) and a French one (Paris), it does so in the context of a man deeply in love with his wife and child. This absence of the cold critical perspective keeps Gopnik from seeming judgmental or perpetuating stereotypes. I was sorry when it was over.

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