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ADNY Caught in a cycle where they have to increase prices because they don't get enough customers thus discouraging new customers. Plus the food isn’t very good.   Pure Food and Wine If Roxanne

ADNY is not a loss leader for the whole Ducasse organization. I doubt that that many people would go to Ducasse's French/Italian establishments because they experienced a good meal at ADNY. If they a

Here are the details:   "SAM DE MARCO has closed FIRST, his 10-year-old restaurant at 87 First Avenue (Fifth Street). He will be the consulting chef at MOVIDA, a nightclub and lounge opening soon at

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Zagat reports that the Upper East Side French old-timer Le Boeuf à la Mode is closing at the end of the month. While it was never a destination place, it had a 50-year run, and it still has this significance: like the Amazon rainforest: when it's chopped down, it will never grow back again.

One of my go-to places in the late 60's and early 70's - especially when I lived on E.74th Street.

 

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The place of my youth was McDonald's, and it's still open.

So let's see, we had the discussion about who was the brains behind several people. Were you the brains behind Ray Kroc?

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The place of my youth was McDonald's, and it's still open.

So let's see, we had the discussion about who was the brains behind several people. Were you the brains behind Ray Kroc?

I taught him how to respect the ingredients.

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The place of my youth was McDonald's, and it's still open.

So let's see, we had the discussion about who was the brains behind several people. Were you the brains behind Ray Kroc?

I taught him how to respect the ingredients.

...and the secret of life has come full circle.

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Chatham Restaurant is gone -- the old coffee shop/dim sum place on the Bowery, not to be confused with Chatham Sq Restaurant, the new fancy-ish restaurant a few doors farther south (with bizarre wine service).

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I think the discussion of Gabe Stullman's take-over of the Fedora space on Vanishing New York is interesting. (And not just because I'm a participant.)

 

People are concerned that Fedora will become another Beatrice Inn/Minetta Tavern, and it's hard not to sympathize. But on the other hand, once the 90-year-old owner decided to retire, what did Fedora's customers expect? They have no entitlement to a continuation of the restaurant. Plenty of places I've liked have closed over the years and been replaced by places I've liked less. It's not like the regulars ever offered to get together and buy Fedora out themselves.

 

Fedora's regulars would argue that they're entitled to special consideration because they're an aging population (by "aging," I mean old even by Rich's and my standards), with few other places to go. But I'd say that's why you could never expect a new owner to cater particularly to them.

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I think the discussion of Gabe Stullman's take-over of the Fedora space on Vanishing New York is interesting. (And not just because I'm a participant.)

 

People are concerned that Fedora will become another Beatrice Inn/Minetta Tavern, and it's hard not to sympathize. But on the other hand, once the 90-year-old owner decided to retire, what did Fedora's customers expect? They have no entitlement to a continuation of the restaurant. Plenty of places I've liked have closed over the years and been replaced by places I've liked less. It's not like the regulars ever offered to get together and buy Fedora out themselves.

 

Fedora's regulars would argue that they're entitled to special consideration because they're an aging population (by "aging," I mean old even by Rich's and my standards), with few other places to go. But I'd say that's why you could never expect a new owner to cater particularly to them.

I'm most bothered by the fact that the food at Joseph Leonard is terrible and now he's got two expansion spaces going. Seems like a recipe for disaster in the medium term.

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I think the discussion of Gabe Stullman's take-over of the Fedora space on Vanishing New York is interesting. (And not just because I'm a participant.)

 

People are concerned that Fedora will become another Beatrice Inn/Minetta Tavern, and it's hard not to sympathize. But on the other hand, once the 90-year-old owner decided to retire, what did Fedora's customers expect? They have no entitlement to a continuation of the restaurant. Plenty of places I've liked have closed over the years and been replaced by places I've liked less. It's not like the regulars ever offered to get together and buy Fedora out themselves.

 

Fedora's regulars would argue that they're entitled to special consideration because they're an aging population (by "aging," I mean old even by Rich's and my standards), with few other places to go. But I'd say that's why you could never expect a new owner to cater particularly to them.

What bothers me most of all is that all the nostalgists seem to think there's something privileged or special about the last half century that makes it especially worthy of preservation. What the hell is wrong with a city actually organically evolving? Seems like New York's gotten by just fine with most of its 19th century buildings and institutions gone.

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I think the discussion of Gabe Stullman's take-over of the Fedora space on Vanishing New York is interesting. (And not just because I'm a participant.)

 

People are concerned that Fedora will become another Beatrice Inn/Minetta Tavern, and it's hard not to sympathize. But on the other hand, once the 90-year-old owner decided to retire, what did Fedora's customers expect? They have no entitlement to a continuation of the restaurant. Plenty of places I've liked have closed over the years and been replaced by places I've liked less. It's not like the regulars ever offered to get together and buy Fedora out themselves.

 

Fedora's regulars would argue that they're entitled to special consideration because they're an aging population (by "aging," I mean old even by Rich's and my standards), with few other places to go. But I'd say that's why you could never expect a new owner to cater particularly to them.

What bothers me most of all is that all the nostalgists seem to think there's something privileged or special about the last half century that makes it especially worthy of preservation. What the hell is wrong with a city actually organically evolving? Seems like New York's gotten by just fine with most of its 19th century buildings and institutions gone.

I guess you had to have been there.

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I like to point out to East Village nostalgists that whatever it is they want to preserve wouldn't be there if something else hadn't been knocked down to make room for it. It's a perennial urban dilemma. Cities will change, and they won't wait for us. It just hurts to lose something we ourselves have a connection with.

 

If I remember rightly, the Fedora is not just an old restaurant; wasn't it one of the only openly gay restaurants for many years?

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