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Man Ray was the nom-de-stylo of Emmanuel Radnitzky from Philadelphia,who became a photographer. When he was 28, he took a pretty good picture. His success led him to get his friend Marcel Duchamp to join him in taking out the American franchise of Dadaism, word about which non-artistic non-movement had sailed over to NY from Europe.

 

He found a number of new ways of screwing around with photographs, but nobody around home was much interested. So he decided that New York wasn't ready for Dada, and went to Paris. (So did Duchamp.) Paris was more interested in his experimental pics than the tight-assed New Yorkers but not so much in his Dada. So he resigned from Dadaism and took out a card in Surrealism, where he was the only photographer, a kind of competition he relished.

 

He discovered a young woman named Kiki in Montparnasse and took her on as a model and "companion." (Saying he discovered her is like saying Calvin Trillin discovered Arthur Bryant's, like nobody had ever been there before. Hah.) One photo of her became perhaps his most famous, and he called it Violon d'Ingres. Restaurateur Christian Constant stole the name for one of his restaurants, and got a prize (maybe) for having the most often misspelled restaurant name in history.

 

If you've never seen it, here it is.

 

56607715.jpg

Violon d'Ingres, Man Ray

 

If you want to know more about Ingres, try google. :D

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Man Ray was the nom-de-stylo of Emmanuel Radnitzky from Philadelphia,who became a photographer. When he was 28, he took a pretty good picture. His success led him to get his friend Marcel Duchamp to join him in taking out the American franchise of Dadaism, word about which non-artistic non-movement had sailed over to NY from Europe.

 

He found a number of new ways of screwing around with photographs, but nobody around home was much interested. So he decided that New York wasn't ready for Dada, and went to Paris. (So did Duchamp.) Paris was more interested in his experimental pics than the tight-assed New Yorkers but not so much in his Dada. So he resigned from Dadaism and took out a card in Surrealism, where he was the only photographer, a kind of competition he relished.

 

He discovered a young woman named Kiki in Montparnasse and took her on as a model and "companion." (Saying he discovered her is like saying Calvin Trillin discovered Arthur Bryant's, like nobody had ever been there before. Hah.) One photo of her became perhaps his most famous, and he called it Violon d'Ingres. Restaurateur Christian Constant stole the name for one of his restaurants, and got a prize (maybe) for having the most often misspelled restaurant name in history.

 

 

With all respect, I wouldn't agree that Constant took the name "Violon d'Ingres" from Man Ray. A bit of background might be in order. Violon d'Ingres also means "hobby", in French, and is commonly understood to refer to that (including when Man Ray used that term in pun for the artwork described above) :blink:

 

http://www.leviolondingres.com/eng_reviews.htm

 

See the pun intended by the title, based on the French reference to hobby, suggested by the title to the Man Ray painting. "Man Ray was an admirer of the paintings of Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres and made a series of photographs, inspired by Ingres's languorous nudes, of the model Kiki in a turban. Painting the f -holes of a stringed instrument onto the photographic print and then rephotographing the print, Man Ray altered what was originally a classical nude. He also added the title Le Violon d'Ingres , a French idiom that means "hobby."

The transformation of Kiki's body into a musical instrument with the crude addition of a few brushstrokes makes this a humorous image, but her armless form is also disturbing to contemplate. The title seems to suggest that, while playing the violin was Ingres's hobby, toying with Kiki was a pastime of Man Ray. The picture maintains a tension between objectification and appreciation of the female form."

 

http://webapps.getty.edu/art/collections/objects/o61240.html

 

Also, the name "Violon d'Ingres" obviously also refers to the decor of the restaurant, which has nothing to do with the artwork shown above (of course not included in any of the artwork in the restaurant). "Hard not to notice the outsize paintings by Ingres, an artist from Chef Constant's native Montauban. They are actually details taken from his paintings and reproduced on fabric." All the painting details reproduced from Ingres in the restaurant are in reddish tones.

 

http://www.leviolondingres.com/eng_ambiance.htm

 

I like the decor at Violon, although I don't like the cuisine (based on only one visit). I especially like the details relating to hands painted in some of Ingres' paintings included in the enlarged portions on the walls.

 

Also, when you refer to Constant's restaurant being misspelt, that might be the effect from an American or English-speaking perspective, but the word "violon" of course is the French name for "violin". So it's only English-speaking people who might misspell the name. <_<

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If I had been striving for scholastic merit, I would have made some further observations, such as the following. ;) Whilst this may or may not not have been Constant's intention, the notion of "Violon d'Ingres" or "hobby" has several interesting conceptual playful notions, with respect to highlighting the significance of perspective in dining. The name begs the question: From whose perspective is the restaurant/dining a hobby?

 

-- Is good food a hobby from the perspective of the diners, in the sense that it is beyond the type of food required for sustenance?

 

-- Is cuisine Constant's livelihood, and not a hobby, in the sense that the restaurant does have as one of its objectives profit-oriented objectives? Whose perspective is more relevant, the name almost asks -- the chef's or the diners'?

 

-- Is Constant's desire to please his diners and pursue his culinary endeavors a necessity for him, a passion, an endeavor beyond a hobby?

 

-- Is Constant indicating he enjoys cooking so much it gives him the pleasure of a "hobby" and isn't really "work"? Is he trying to be playful with respect to his cusine?

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:lol: :D

Gentleman, while this thread has brought me a much needed smile this morning; somehow I don't think this is quite what Maurice had in mind for the evolution of this thread. :D

 

Maurice-for that I apologize. :)

 

We now return you to our regularly scheduled programming.

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I don't have any art (singular) educational background, but am finding I can increasingly interpret works. Perhaps it's a reflection of my application same approach I use in evaluating cuisine to the evaluation of everything else. :lol:

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:lol: :D

Gentleman, while this thread has brought me a much needed smile this morning; somehow I don't think this is quite what Maurice had in mind for the evolution of this thread. :D

 

Maurice-for that I apologize. :)

 

We now return you to our regularly scheduled programming.

Nick-- Au contraire! You and Melonious and Wilfrid have addressed my little bit of art-critic satire more than appropriately. I'm quite cheered. I wonder if any of you have read some of the responses elicited by Swift's "Modest Proposal." Capitally comparable with the present day's, I assure you.

 

And, Nick, how uncannily prescient your last sentence is!

 

:P :D :D :rolleyes:

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So your girlfriend rolls a Honda, playin' workout tapes by Fonda

But Fonda ain't got a motor in the back of her Honda

My anaconda don't want none

Unless you've got buns, hon

You can do side bends or sit-ups,

But please don't lose that butt

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