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Wilfrid

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Loved Patricia Marx's article, as always.  I'm an avid convert to Too Good to Go, though so far I've only used it to buy baked goods.  I too have been disappointed in expecting a meal and getting pastries (cf., Le Sandwich in North Beach), but I can easily score bags from one of my favorite local bakeries and could probably get some nice dinners if I was able to hang around the city late enough.  The Holy Grail will be getting an Acme Bakery bag on a day when I'm in the office.

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Hannah's article strikes a chord, as I consistently argue with everyone about bagels.

Quote

I’m hardly the first to note the broad downward spiral of New York bagels, which were first made by Ellis Island-era Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe and, over the course of the twentieth century, began to assimilate. Once uniformly small, dense, salty, and malty—traditionally, the dough is boiled in water and barley malt syrup before baking—bagels surpassed doughnuts in popularity in the U.S. but also evolved to look more like them, becoming sweeter, paler, and softer. Even in New York, they’ve attained obscene new forms (see: the rainbow bagel), adopted increasingly outlandish flavors, such as French toast (what cinnamon-raisin hath wrought!), and grown ever more puffy as traditional methods of hand-rolling gave way to high-output mechanization. 

Are We Living Through a Bagel Renaissance?

(Though you can hand roll a bagel, and it still might suck!)

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Shteyngart was entertaining; useful in that it mentioned some bars I didn’t know and some drinks I would at all costs avoid.

I don’t know if poetic license was invoked in terms of his vast intake. Six to ten pro martini cocktails in one evening? Even over a few hours and with blotting paper food, few people would remain upright. Must be more than a bottle of gin/vodka.

I can drink, but I would only essay six martinis if they were the thimble-sized variety served in The Thin Man movies. I recall that at Mont Blanc 52, for example, where the capacious glasses were filled to the rim, my strict limit was two. Okay, then I’d have a beer.

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Bagels: “small, dense, salty, and malty…”

Sounds like the bagels I recall from my childhood in London and indeed New York bagels have always disappointed me in comparison.

Haven’t read the article yet.

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First I read the article about eating rattlesnake. I knew I had eaten it, so I looked back to find out where. Tim Love’s place in Austin. Then the rabbit hole led me to this, which I haven’t seen in years. Who is the tubby guy?

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Is the magazine laying off editors? This must be one of the most misconceived* articles I have ever read.

Yes, time being what it is — always headed into the future — we don’t know for sure what will happen next. And indeed in (traditional) fiction we turn the pages to find out what happens next.

Those platitudes do not imply that most fiction — and life as well! — partakes in the condition of “suspense,” explicitly equated in the article to Hitchcock movies and thrillers. I do not know if I will clean my teeth tonight, but that doesn’t mean I am in “Psycho.”

I can’t believe this got a green light, let alone published.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2024/05/27/the-secrets-of-suspense

*Dumb, just dumb.

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And then you get Anthony Lane on an extreme book abridgement app, writing with a vast reservoir of literary and cultural knowledge and capable of hilarious phrases like “staring warmly at your muffin.”

Insider footnote: Some will remember Sole Proprietor (“SP”) at a foodie forum some years ago demanding to know why the meaning and message of “Moby Dick” shouldn’t be presented in a few paragraphs. This app is for him.

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On 5/23/2024 at 11:37 PM, Wilfrid said:

I can’t believe this got a green light, let alone published.

A third of the way through, I bailed because I realized I didn’t care how it ended. I guess suspense really is important! (Then I went back and read the last paragraph and barfed.)

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  • 2 weeks later...

They are back with a hard hitting re-examination of the controversial Maillard Reaction. Thank goodness there is a publication willing to tackle the hard issues of the day. End the tyranny!!

"Cooks are beginning to quietly react against the provocations of the Maillard reaction."

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/kitchen-notes/the-maillard-over-reaction

Edited by backyardchef
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